pravity

pravity

(ˈprævɪtɪ)
n
1. depravity, moral degeneracy, perversion
2. archaic (in contexts other than morality) corruption, poor quality, unwholesomeness
3. archaic (physically, particularly of the limbs) twisted quality, deformity
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in classic literature ?
Sin, seen from the thought, is a diminution, or less: seen from the conscience or will, it is pravity or bad.
He did believe that men would be all the better for behaving more rationally, as the sorry picture Gulliver draws of life in his native country amply demonstrates; but the horror of his Houyhnhnm master at the vices of mankind is no answer, if only because it cannot cope with the evil in man: Gulliver is banished from Houyhnhnmland because it is feared that his "rudiments of reason, added to the natural pravity" of the Yahoos (Part IV, Chapter 10) might drive these to rebel against their masters.
However, with his uncle's support he became 'Apostolic Inquisitor of the Evora Inquisition, member of the Order of Christ, commissioner and visitador of the Holy Office against the heretical 'pravity' and apostasy in the States of Para and Maranhao (1763)"!
Thus, though the "goodness and pravity" of the blood can fluctuate due to "internal conditions," such as exorbitant passions, blood is especially sensitive to outside influence--to the ambient air, for example.