prebendary

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preb·en·dar·y

 (prĕb′ən-dĕr′ē)
n. pl. preb·en·dar·ies
1. A member of the Anglican clergy who receives a prebend.
2. An Anglican cleric holding the honorary title of prebend without a stipend.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

prebendary

(ˈprɛbəndərɪ; -drɪ)
n, pl -daries
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) a canon or member of the chapter of a cathedral or collegiate church who holds a prebend
2. (Anglicanism) Church of England an honorary canon with the title of prebendary
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

preb•en•dar•y

(ˈprɛb ənˌdɛr i)

n., pl. -dar•ies.
1. a canon or cleric entitled to a prebend.
2. an honorary canon in the Church of England having the title of a prebend but not receiving a stipend.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.prebendary - a canon who receives a prebend for serving the church
canon - a priest who is a member of a cathedral chapter
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

prebendary

[ˈprebəndərɪ] Nprebendado m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

prebendary

nPfründner m, → Pfründeninhaber m, → Präbendar(ius) m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in classic literature ?
The diminutive Abbe Scarron, who, however, was an abbe only because he owned an abbey, and not because he was in orders, had formerly been one of the gayest prebendaries in the town of Mans, which he inhabited.
One would almost imagine from the long list that is given of cannibal primates, bishops, arch-deacons, prebendaries, and other inferior ecclesiastics, that the sacerdotal order far outnumbered the rest of the population, and that the poor natives were more severely priest-ridden than even the inhabitants of the papal states.
Prebendaries are appointed by the Bishop after consultation with the Dean of St Paul's in recognition of their work in the Diocese.
"We assume that the prebendaries used the bridge originally to visit their prebends, income-producing land."
(83) Greg Walker has referred to Heywood as 'in many ways an oppositional playwright' and as a man 'out of sympathy with the religious reforms of the 1530s and 1540s', and it seems that he came perilously close to dying for his beliefs in 1543 when he was condemned for denying the royal supremacy in the aftermath of the 'Prebendaries Plot' to remove Archbishop Thomas Cranmer from office.
The street name referred to the manses of the "canons-regular" or prebendaries of the cathedral; historian William Orem describes their duties: "They were the parsons of the churches in the country, and had curates under them who performed divine service at their respective churches."