preceptor

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pre·cep·tor

 (prĭ-sĕp′tər, prē′sĕp′tər)
n.
1. A teacher; an instructor.
2. An expert or specialist, such as a physician, who gives practical experience and training to a student, especially of medicine or nursing.
3. The head of a preceptory.

[Middle English, from Latin praeceptor, from praecipere, to teach; see precept.]

pre′cep·to′ri·al (prē′sĕp-tôr′ē-əl) adj.
pre′cep·to′ri·al·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

preceptor

(prɪˈsɛptə)
n
1. (Education) US a practising physician giving practical training to a medical student
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) the head of a preceptory
3. (Education) rare a tutor or instructor
preˈceptorate n
preceptorial, preˈceptoral adj
preˈceptorˌship n
preˈceptress fem n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

pre•cep•tor

(prɪˈsɛp tər, ˈpri sɛp-)

n.
1. an instructor; teacher; tutor.
2. the head of a school.
3. the head of a preceptory.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Latin]
pre`cep•to′ri•al (-ˈtɔr i əl, -ˈtoʊr-) adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.preceptor - teacher at a university or college (especially at Cambridge or Oxford)
Britain, Great Britain, U.K., UK, United Kingdom, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland - a monarchy in northwestern Europe occupying most of the British Isles; divided into England and Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland; `Great Britain' is often used loosely to refer to the United Kingdom
instructor, teacher - a person whose occupation is teaching
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

preceptor

[prɪˈseptəʳ] Npreceptor m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

preceptor

n (old, form)Lehrer m, → Präzeptor m (old)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in classic literature ?
For they are thy warmest friends and preceptors!"--
And because we have all to pass through a state of infancy to manhood, and have been of necessity, for a length of time, governed by our desires and preceptors (whose dictates were frequently conflicting, while neither perhaps always counseled us for the best), I farther concluded that it is almost impossible that our judgments can be so correct or solid as they would have been, had our reason been mature from the moment of our birth, and had we always been guided by it alone.
Under the guidance of my new preceptors I entered with the greatest diligence into the search of the philosopher's stone and the elixir of life; but the latter soon obtained my undivided attention.
* was Preceptor; as the principal Knights of Saint John were
"Seeing, then, that my nurse and preceptor were carried off, and that I, also, was separated from them - either they were, or I am, very dangerous to my enemy?"
But in considering Cyrus and others who have acquired or founded kingdoms, all will be found admirable; and if their particular deeds and conduct shall be considered, they will not be found inferior to those of Moses, although he had so great a preceptor. And in examining their actions and lives one cannot see that they owed anything to fortune beyond opportunity, which brought them the material to mould into the form which seemed best to them.
To say the truth, Blifil had greatly gained his master's affections; partly by the profound respect he always showed his person, but much more by the decent reverence with which he received his doctrine; for he had got by heart, and frequently repeated, his phrases, and maintained all his master's religious principles with a zeal which was surprizing in one so young, and which greatly endeared him to the worthy preceptor.
Here, too, was Tit, Levin's preceptor in the art of mowing, a thin little peasant.
Down went the black legs and up came the gray head, as the preceptor said, with undisturbed dignity, "Good evening, Mr.
Dessalles, the tutor he had brought from Switzerland, was wearing a coat of Russian cut and talking broken Russian to the servants, but was still the same narrowly intelligent, conscientious, and pedantic preceptor. The old prince had changed in appearance only by the loss of a tooth, which left a noticeable gap on one side of his mouth; in character he was the same as ever, only showing still more irritability and skepticism as to what was happening in the world.
The boy, patterning his conduct after that of his preceptor, unstoppered the vials of his invective upon the head of the enemy, until in realization of the futility of words as weapons he bethought himself of something heavier to hurl.
They knew not the meanings of the words they mouthed; they but repeated the ritual that had been handed down from preceptor to neophyte since that long-gone day when the ancestors of the Piltdown man still swung by their tails in the humid jungles that are England now.