preciosity


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Related to preciosity: reconcilement

pre·ci·os·i·ty

 (prĕsh′ē-ŏs′ĭ-tē, prĕs′-)
n. pl. pre·ci·os·i·ties
1. Overrefinement, as in language, taste, or style.
2. An instance of overrefinement.

[Middle English preciousite, preciousness, from Old French preciosite, from Latin pretiōsitās, from pretiōsus, precious, from pretium, price; see precious.]

preciosity

(ˌprɛʃɪˈɒsɪtɪ)
n, pl -ties
fastidiousness or affectation, esp in speech or manners

pre•ci•os•i•ty

(ˌprɛʃ iˈɒs ɪ ti)

n., pl. -ties.
fastidious or carefully affected refinement, as in language or style.
[1350–1400; < Middle French < Latin]

preciosity

excessive fastidiousness or over-refinement in language or behavior.
See also: Behavior, Language
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.preciosity - the quality of being fastidious or excessively refined
affectedness - the quality of being false or artificial (as to impress others)
Translations

preciosity

[ˌpresɪˈɒsɪtɪ] N (frm) → preciosidad f

preciosity

nPretiosität f, → Preziosität f
References in periodicals archive ?
His ingenuity places much pressure on the prismatic effect of such words as "strabismus," "tragomaschality," "triforium," "erythroglot," and "metanairesis," whose preciosity and difficulty add to the poem's lyric drive.
I've sometime found Dame Mitsuko's performances of Schubert rather studied, veering towards preciosity, but not here in his Four Impromptus D.
As O'Sullivan explains, "Wilde had given her a vocabulary and a preciosity that her notebooks and early sketches declare as pervasive.
Thus, as the art of speaking according to certain rules is itself reflective of Dianas social reality, so is apprehension about the intricate and excessive preciosity of language.
The jury unanimously selected Nour Hage because "she works [her] fabric with much precision and preciosity.
Wells, and Maeterlinck crop up in the text; the use of adjectives such as charming ('charming little place,' 139), exquisite ('the ferns are almost too exquisite,' 146), perfect ('a perfect panorama of sunset,' 139), and the preciosity of style are redolent of the decadent, largely European literature in which Mansfield was immersed at that time.
Speaking of the preciosity of love, Badiou writes, "Everyone knows that deciding to break off such love, particularly unilaterally, is always a disaster, whatever the excellent reasons put forward to support such a move" (Badiou and Truong 2012, 46).
The corporeal reality of the present moment takes precedence over acts of memory or hypothetical projections, and the language of everyday life pushes away preciosity and poeticism.
And "when half-learnedness shakes hands with preciosity and snobbery, one may commit mistakes that are harder and harder to eliminate" (Theodor Hristea).
Working-class Irish Catholic, educated by Jesuits at Boston College High School and then Boston College itself, convolutedly erudite and streetwise (though never streetwise enough) by necessity, abjected through class origins, drug addictions and mental illness, patrician in his range of high literary and cultural allusions and sensitivities; and disgusted alternately by the philistinism of his parents and their milieu and by the rigidity and preciosity of highbrow institutions, Wieners inhabited--and performed--in particularly intensified form the purgatory of the in-between that marked upwardly mobile white male youth of the 1950s.
Although most interpret this last line as allegorical, Tartuffe's metaphoric preciosity also strategically serves to foreshadow what some in the audience will later see when the "table scene" is performed according to the performance tradition in which its stage properties, les deux flambeaux, become religiously potent--the material desecration of an altar.
Denying--at least rhetorically--art's preciosity and privileged status freed up the creativity of her students, offering a way to create out of the sanctified realm of the classroom, gallery, and museum.