precipice


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

prec·i·pice

 (prĕs′ə-pĭs)
n.
1. An overhanging or extremely steep mass of rock, such as a crag or the face of a cliff.
2. The brink of a dangerous or disastrous situation: on the precipice of defeat.

[French précipice, from Latin praecipitium, from praeceps, praecipit-, headlong; see precipitate.]

precipice

(ˈprɛsɪpɪs)
n
1. (Physical Geography)
a. the steep sheer face of a cliff or crag
b. the cliff or crag itself
2. a precarious situation
[C16: from Latin praecipitium steep place, from praeceps headlong]
ˈprecipiced adj

prec•i•pice

(ˈprɛs ə pɪs)

n.
1. a cliff with a vertical, nearly vertical, or overhanging face.
2. a situation of great peril.
[1590–1600; < Middle French < Latin praecipitium steep place =praecipit- (s. of praeceps) steep, headlong]
prec′i•piced, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.precipice - a very steep cliffprecipice - a very steep cliff      
cliff, drop-off, drop - a steep high face of rock; "he stood on a high cliff overlooking the town"; "a steep drop"

precipice

noun cliff, crag, rock face, cliff face, height, brink, bluff, sheer drop, steep cliff, scarp The path had sheer rock on one side and a precipice on the other.
Translations
جُرْف، هاويَه
propast
stejl klippe
òverhnípi
skardingasstatus
krauja
prepad

precipice

[ˈpresɪpɪs] Nprecipicio m, despeñadero m

precipice

[ˈprɛsɪpɪs] nprécipice m

precipice

n (lit, fig)Abgrund m

precipice

[ˈprɛsɪpɪs] nprecipizio
on the edge of a precipice → sull'orlo del precepizio

precipice

(ˈpresipis) noun
a steep cliff.
precipitous (priˈsipitəs) adjective
very steep.
References in classic literature ?
It was somewhere near this part of the day that the noise of falling waters, which we had faintly caught in the early morning, became more distinct; and it was not long before we were arrested by a rocky precipice of nearly a hundred feet in depth, that extended all across the channel, and over which the wild stream poured in an unbroken leap.
Substituting a stout stick for the one I had thrown aside at the top of the precipice, we now continued our course along the bed of the ravine.
The black-tailed deer would bound up the ravines on their approach, and the bighorn would gaze fearlessly down upon them from some impending precipice, or skip playfully from rock to rock.
Ben Jones the hunter, however, in one of the passes of the Black Hills, succeeded in bringing down a bighorn from the verge of a precipice, the flesh of which was pronounced by the gormands of the camp to have the flavor of excellent mutton.
Sometimes we slopped along in a narrow path on the left-hand side of the track, but by and by when the fog blew as aside a little and we saw that we were treading the rampart of a precipice and that our left elbows were projecting over a perfectly boundless and bottomless vacancy, we gasped, and jumped for the ties again.
Or unto eagles like which fixedly, Long adown the precipice look, Adown THEIR precipice:-- Oh, how they whirl down now, Thereunder, therein, To ever deeper profoundness whirling
AN ASS, being driven along a high road, suddenly started off and bolted to the brink of a deep precipice.
They accord with the nature of such scenery, and add much to its romantic effect; bounding like goats from crag to crag, often trooping along the lofty shelves of the mountains, under the guidance of some venerable patriarch with horns twisted lower than his muzzle, and sometimes peering over the edge of a precipice, so high that they appear scarce bigger than crows; indeed, it seems a pleasure to them to seek the most rugged and frightful situations, doubtless from a feeling of security.
I feel as if I were walking on the edge of a precipice, towards which thousands are crowding and endeavouring to plunge me into the abyss.
Verily," sighed the Pharisee, as he peered dizzily over the precipice, "the uncircumcised are as the sands by the seashore-as the locusts in the wilderness
Agnes, I want you to take a walk with me to--' (he named a certain part of the coast--a bold hill on the land side, and towards the sea a steep precipice, from the summit of which a glorious view is to be had).
One September night a family had gathered round their hearth, and piled it high with the driftwood of mountain streams, the dry cones of the pine, and the splintered ruins of great trees that had come crashing down the precipice.