precipice

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prec·i·pice

 (prĕs′ə-pĭs)
n.
1. An overhanging or extremely steep mass of rock, such as a crag or the face of a cliff.
2. The brink of a dangerous or disastrous situation: on the precipice of defeat.

[French précipice, from Latin praecipitium, from praeceps, praecipit-, headlong; see precipitate.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

precipice

(ˈprɛsɪpɪs)
n
1. (Physical Geography)
a. the steep sheer face of a cliff or crag
b. the cliff or crag itself
2. a precarious situation
[C16: from Latin praecipitium steep place, from praeceps headlong]
ˈprecipiced adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

prec•i•pice

(ˈprɛs ə pɪs)

n.
1. a cliff with a vertical, nearly vertical, or overhanging face.
2. a situation of great peril.
[1590–1600; < Middle French < Latin praecipitium steep place =praecipit- (s. of praeceps) steep, headlong]
prec′i•piced, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.precipice - a very steep cliffprecipice - a very steep cliff      
cliff, drop-off, drop - a steep high face of rock; "he stood on a high cliff overlooking the town"; "a steep drop"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

precipice

noun cliff, crag, rock face, cliff face, height, brink, bluff, sheer drop, steep cliff, scarp The path had sheer rock on one side and a precipice on the other.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
جُرْف، هاويَه
propast
stejl klippe
òverhnípi
skardingasstatus
krauja
prepad

precipice

[ˈpresɪpɪs] Nprecipicio m, despeñadero m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

precipice

[ˈprɛsɪpɪs] nprécipice m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

precipice

n (lit, fig)Abgrund m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

precipice

[ˈprɛsɪpɪs] nprecipizio
on the edge of a precipice → sull'orlo del precepizio
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

precipice

(ˈpresipis) noun
a steep cliff.
precipitous (priˈsipitəs) adjective
very steep.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
The Black Hills are chiefly composed of sandstone, and in many places are broken into savage cliffs and precipices, and present the most singular and fantastic forms; sometimes resembling towns and castellated fortresses.
The steamboats skimming along under the stupendous precipices were diminished by distance to the daintiest little toys, the sailboats and rowboats to shallops proper for fairies that keep house in the cups of lilies and ride to court on the backs of bumblebees.
Its sources might lie among wild and inaccessible cliffs, and tumble and foam down rugged defiles and over craggy precipices; but its direction was in the true course, and up this stream he determined to prosecute his route to the Rocky Mountains.
The immense mountains and precipices that overhung me on every side, the sound of the river raging among the rocks, and the dashing of the waterfalls around spoke of a power mighty as Omnipotence--and I ceased to fear or to bend before any being less almighty than that which had created and ruled the elements, here displayed in their most terrific guise.
It was somewhere near this part of the day that the noise of falling waters, which we had faintly caught in the early morning, became more distinct; and it was not long before we were arrested by a rocky precipice of nearly a hundred feet in depth, that extended all across the channel, and over which the wild stream poured in an unbroken leap.
Or unto eagles like which fixedly, Long adown the precipice look, Adown THEIR precipice:-- Oh, how they whirl down now, Thereunder, therein, To ever deeper profoundness whirling!-- Then,
"Verily," sighed the Pharisee, as he peered dizzily over the precipice, "the uncircumcised are as the sands by the seashore-as the locusts in the wilderness!
'Agnes, I want you to take a walk with me to--' (he named a certain part of the coast--a bold hill on the land side, and towards the sea a steep precipice, from the summit of which a glorious view is to be had).
One September night a family had gathered round their hearth, and piled it high with the driftwood of mountain streams, the dry cones of the pine, and the splintered ruins of great trees that had come crashing down the precipice. Up the chimney roared the fire, and brightened the room with its broad blaze.