precisian

pre·ci·sian

 (prĭ-sĭzh′ən)
n.
1. One who is strict and precise in adherence to established rules, forms, or standards, especially with regard to religious observance or moral behavior.
2. A Puritan.

[From precise.]

pre·ci′sian·ism n.

precisian

(prɪˈsɪʒən) or

precisianist

n
a punctilious observer of rules or forms, esp in the field of religion
preˈcisianism n

precisian

- An overly precise person, a strict observer of rules and procedures.
See also related terms for rules.
References in classic literature ?
Thus having triumphed over you, I will set my countenance like a precisian, and begin to speak thus:-- Truly, my dear brethren, my master is within at dinner, with Valdes and Cornelius, as this wine, if it could speak, would inform your worships: and so, the Lord bless you, preserve you, and keep you, my dear brethren!
The coldest precisian cannot go abroad without encountering inexplicable influences.
On the debit side, historians tell us that he was a humorless precisian, an admirer of Prussian militarism, and a withering critic of civilian control of the military.
How now Will, become a precisian? (5.11-18) Coming in such close proximity, these senses of will ask us to see it as a kind of keyword in this scene and play.
D'Amville questions Borachio about the departing Snuffe--"Borachio, didst precisely note this man?"--drawing attention to what an audience hardly could have not noted: that he is a precisian, whose "own profession would report him pure." D'Amville's anatomy of this character type might further suggest that his avowed atheism derives from a practical atheism at large.
He's no precisian, that I am certain of, Nor rigid Roman Catholic.
Measurement of swelling: Knee diameter was measured using calibrated digital caliper (world precisian Instruments, Stevenage, UK) in mm (millimeter) as described by Janet et al.
Besides being equally committed to Erastianism and sola scriptura, Jewel was divided by his work as a scholar and his duties as a bishop, and by his public persona as a staunch defender of the Elizabethan settlement and his private, precisian leanings, which often left him frustrated with the pace and direction of English reform.
The Puritan (Latinate/pompous) diction of this phrasing of Angelo's suggests his self-importance, and thus the possibility that he may have played the precisian unfairly, too strictly, with the woman who selflessly loves him despite his failure to comfort her when she lost her brother along with her dowry in a sea-wreck.
He also defends himself against "a rigid Precisian, objecting, that flowers from Romish Authors extracted, became lesse wholesome and divinely redolent" (226).
Every child, however, is a willful precisian, holding parents to the letter of what is said with a "But you said...." A quite willful precisian indeed when I was an importuning boy, I wanted to know just how long my mother's "just a moment" meant.