precombustion

precombustion

(ˈpriːkəmˈbʌstʃən)
adj
(General Engineering) of or relating to the period immediately before combustion
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
In fact, precombustion or post combustion, CO2 capture followed by compression and geological sequestration is one of those efforts made to reduce CO2 emissions, but is energy intensive, hence costly.
The fuel grain was pushed toward the nozzle entrance, according to Figure 4, to provide a larger precombustion chamber and to give more time for evaporating the oxidizer.
Nowadays, the efforts are mainly concentrated on C[O.sub.2]-rich combustion gases such as postcombustion, oxyfuel, and precombustion gases.
According to Figure 3, the combustion of coal can be divided into three stages: precombustion, combustion, and stabilization.
The CCS technology is a means to control emissions of C[O.sub.2] that are captured from different processes including precombustion, postcombustion, and oxy-fuel combustion.
In diesel engines, where up to 50% recycle is possible, the hot recirculated exhaust gas replaces a proportion of oxygen in the precombustion mixture (ref.
Each plant heat rate could then be used to calculate precombustion energy use and emissions of the plant fuel using the calculation methodology described in Leslie et.
So far, scientists have developed three ways to capture carbon from power plants and other emission sources: oxy-fuel combustion, precombustion and postcombustion.
An electric conversion factor of 3.513 (Table B-9 Mississippi Total Precombustion Source Energy Factor) and a natural gas factor of 1.092 (Table 5 Source Energy Factors for Fuel Delivered to Buildings) were utilized.