preempt


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pre·empt

 (prē-ĕmpt′)
v. pre·empt·ed, pre·empt·ing, pre·empts
v.tr.
1. To take the place of or take precedence over: Discussion of the water shortage will preempt the other topics on this week's agenda.
2.
a. To take action to prevent (an event or other action) from happening; forestall: "The [Joint] Chiefs ... proposed the use of nuclear weapons to preempt China's anticipated attack on Formosa" (James Carroll).
b. To take action to prevent (another) from acting.
3.
a. To acquire or take for oneself before others; appropriate: "I've preempted the forward compartment [of the boat] with two berths shaped like a V ... to make myself a double bunk" (Joan Gould).
b. To gain possession of by prior right or opportunity, especially to settle on (public land) so as to obtain the right to buy before others.
v.intr. Games
To make a preemptive bid in bridge.

[Back-formation from preemption.]

pre·emp′tor′ (-ĕmp′tôr′) n.
pre·emp′to·ry (-ĕmp′tə-rē) adj.

pre•empt

or pre-empt

(priˈɛmpt)

v.t.
1. to occupy (land) in order to establish a prior right to buy; claim.
2. to acquire or appropriate before someone else; take for oneself; arrogate.
3. to take the place of because of priorities, rescheduling, etc.; supplant: A special news report preempted the game show.
4. to forestall or prevent (something anticipated) by acting first; head off.
v.i.
5. Bridge. to make a preemptive bid.
n.
6. Bridge. a preemptive bid.
[1840–50, Amer.; back formation from preemption]
pre•emp′ti•ble, adj.
pre•emp′tor (-tɔr, -tər) n.
pre•emp′to•ry (-tə ri) adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.preempt - a high bid that is intended to prevent the opposing players from bidding
bidding, bid - (bridge) the number of tricks a bridge player is willing to contract to make
Verb1.preempt - acquire for oneself before others can do so
acquire, get - come into the possession of something concrete or abstract; "She got a lot of paintings from her uncle"; "They acquired a new pet"; "Get your results the next day"; "Get permission to take a few days off from work"
2.preempt - take the place of or have precedence over; "live broadcast of the presidential debate preempts the regular news hour"; "discussion of the emergency situation will preempt the lecture by the professor"
supercede, supersede, supervene upon, supplant, replace - take the place or move into the position of; "Smith replaced Miller as CEO after Miller left"; "the computer has supplanted the slide rule"; "Mary replaced Susan as the team's captain and the highest-ranked player in the school"
3.preempt - gain possession of by prior right or opportunity, especially so as to obtain the right to buy (land)
acquire, get - come into the possession of something concrete or abstract; "She got a lot of paintings from her uncle"; "They acquired a new pet"; "Get your results the next day"; "Get permission to take a few days off from work"
4.preempt - make a preemptive bid in the game of bridge
bridge - any of various card games based on whist for four players
bid, call - make a demand, as for a card or a suit or a show of hands; "He called his trump"

preempt

or pre-empt
verb
1. To lay claim to for oneself or as one's right:
2. To cause to be busy or in use:
References in classic literature ?
Then we have another weird neighbor, who printed a beautiful sign in English and tacked it on the door of his cabin, which we have preempted, warning us to destroy none of his belongings, and signing himself "Tarzan of the Apes."
Thus, all unread in philosophy, Daylight preempted for himself the position and vocation of a twentieth-century superman.
Decisions by federal courts that have concluded that ERISA does not preempt slayer statutes have focused on the fact that slayer statutes are essentially part of family law an area that has long been governed by state law.
The researchers identified state laws enacted through March 16, 2018, that preempt local food and nutrition policies as well as litigation based on claims that food consumption causes obesity or diet-related disease, often referred to as Commonsense Consumption Acts.
Estrada said he hopes that the anti-graft court would decide similarly on his pending plunder case but said he doesn't want to 'preempt' the decision of the Sandiganbayan.
The source said that the Syrian army's artillery and missile units, deployed in the small town of Mahradah Shamali pounded the movements of Kata'eb al-Izzah near the town of al-Latamina in Northern Hama and managed to preempt their attack.
(2) The court found that Section 706 of Telecommunications Act of 1996 fell short of the clear statement that is required to preempt the allocation of power between the states and its subdivisions.
The legislation would preempt states from banning walrus ivory or whale bone products that have been legally carved by Alaska Natives under the Marine Mammal Protection Act.
The findings stem from a (https://blog.preempt.com/1-in-5-enterprise-passwords-compromised) study conducted by authentication company Preempt, which used data collected from 220 organizations that use the Preempt Inspector application, which assesses an organization's password health.
Conversations about how progressive states should resist regressive Trump administration policies and sidestep Republican control of Congress often ignore the elephant in the room-the power of the federal government to preempt state regulations and even the ability of victims of corporate abuse to seek relief in state courts.
Coventry Health Care argued that FEHBA should preempt the state law.