preface

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pref·ace

 (prĕf′ĭs)
n.
1.
a. A preliminary statement or essay introducing a book that explains its scope, intention, or background and is usually written by the author.
b. An introductory section, as of a speech.
2. Something introductory; a preliminary: An informal brunch served as a preface to the three-day conference.
3. often Preface The words introducing the central part of the Eucharist in several Christian churches.
tr.v. pref·aced, pref·ac·ing, pref·ac·es
1. To introduce by or provide with a preliminary statement or essay.
2. To serve as an introduction to.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin praefātiō, praefātiōn-, from praefātus, past participle of praefārī, to say before : prae-, pre- + fārī, to speak; see bhā- in Indo-European roots.]

pref′ac·er n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

preface

(ˈprɛfɪs)
n
1. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a statement written as an introduction to a literary or other work, typically explaining its scope, intention, method, etc; foreword
2. anything introductory
3. (Roman Catholic Church) RC Church a prayer of thanksgiving and exhortation serving as an introduction to the canon of the Mass
vb (tr)
4. to furnish with a preface
5. to serve as a preface to
[C14: from Medieval Latin praefātia, from Latin praefātiō a saying beforehand, from praefārī to utter in advance, from prae before + fārī to say]
ˈprefacer n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

pref•ace

(ˈprɛf ɪs)

n., v. -aced, -ac•ing. n.
1. a preliminary statement in a book by the author or editor, setting forth the book's purpose, acknowledging the assistance of others, etc.
2. an introductory part, as of a speech.
3. a preliminary or introductory event, circumstance, etc.
4. a prayer of thanksgiving, the introduction to the canon of the Mass, ending with the Sanctus.
v.t.
5. to provide with or introduce by a preface.
6. to serve as a preface to.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Middle French < Medieval Latin prēfātia, for Latin praefātiō=praefā(rī) to say beforehand (see pre-, fate) + -tiō -tion]
pref′ac•er, n.
syn: See introduction.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

preface


Past participle: prefaced
Gerund: prefacing

Imperative
preface
preface
Present
I preface
you preface
he/she/it prefaces
we preface
you preface
they preface
Preterite
I prefaced
you prefaced
he/she/it prefaced
we prefaced
you prefaced
they prefaced
Present Continuous
I am prefacing
you are prefacing
he/she/it is prefacing
we are prefacing
you are prefacing
they are prefacing
Present Perfect
I have prefaced
you have prefaced
he/she/it has prefaced
we have prefaced
you have prefaced
they have prefaced
Past Continuous
I was prefacing
you were prefacing
he/she/it was prefacing
we were prefacing
you were prefacing
they were prefacing
Past Perfect
I had prefaced
you had prefaced
he/she/it had prefaced
we had prefaced
you had prefaced
they had prefaced
Future
I will preface
you will preface
he/she/it will preface
we will preface
you will preface
they will preface
Future Perfect
I will have prefaced
you will have prefaced
he/she/it will have prefaced
we will have prefaced
you will have prefaced
they will have prefaced
Future Continuous
I will be prefacing
you will be prefacing
he/she/it will be prefacing
we will be prefacing
you will be prefacing
they will be prefacing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been prefacing
you have been prefacing
he/she/it has been prefacing
we have been prefacing
you have been prefacing
they have been prefacing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been prefacing
you will have been prefacing
he/she/it will have been prefacing
we will have been prefacing
you will have been prefacing
they will have been prefacing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been prefacing
you had been prefacing
he/she/it had been prefacing
we had been prefacing
you had been prefacing
they had been prefacing
Conditional
I would preface
you would preface
he/she/it would preface
we would preface
you would preface
they would preface
Past Conditional
I would have prefaced
you would have prefaced
he/she/it would have prefaced
we would have prefaced
you would have prefaced
they would have prefaced
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011

preface

An introduction, often explaining the structure or purpose of what follows.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.preface - a short introductory essay preceding the text of a book
text, textual matter - the words of something written; "there were more than a thousand words of text"; "they handed out the printed text of the mayor's speech"; "he wants to reconstruct the original text"
introduction - the first section of a communication
Verb1.preface - furnish with a preface or introduction; "She always precedes her lectures with a joke"; "He prefaced his lecture with a critical remark about the institution"
preamble - make a preliminary introduction, usually to a formal document
prologise, prologize, prologuize - write or speak a prologue
say, state, tell - express in words; "He said that he wanted to marry her"; "tell me what is bothering you"; "state your opinion"; "state your name"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

preface

noun
1. introduction, preliminary, prelude, preamble, foreword, prologue, proem, prolegomenon, exordium the preface to the English edition of the novel
verb
1. introduce, precede, open, begin, launch, lead up to, prefix I will preface what I am going to say with a few lines from Shakespeare.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

preface

noun
A short section of preliminary remarks:
verb
To begin (something) with preliminary or prefatory material:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
مُقَدِّمَه
předmluva
forordindledning
alkusanatjohdanto
formáli, inngangur
priekšvārds
predhovor
predgovor

preface

[ˈprefɪs]
A. Nprólogo m, prefacio m
B. VT [+ book] → prologar
he prefaced this by saying thata modo de prólogo a esto dijo que ..., introdujo este tema diciendo que ...
the book is prefaced by an essayel libro tiene un ensayo a modo de prólogo
he has the irritating habit of prefacing his sentences withtiene la molesta costumbre de comenzar las frases con ...
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

preface

[ˈprɛfəs]
npréface f
vtfaire précéder
to preface sth with sth [+ speech, action] → faire précéder qch de qch
He prefaced his remark by saying that ... → En guise d'introduction, il a déclaré que ...
to be prefaced by sth → être précédé par qch
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

preface

nVorwort nt; (of speech)Vorrede f
vteinleiten; bookmit einem Vorwort versehen
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

preface

[ˈprɛfɪs] nprefazione f; (to speech) → introduzione f
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

preface

(ˈprefəs) noun
an introduction to a book etc. The preface explained how to use the dictionary.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in periodicals archive ?
Some of the translators began their prefaces by mentioning the difficulties often associated with the act of translating.
This colorful conjecture that Conrad was prompted to write these prefaces by a premonition of time's winged chariot hurrying near, (6) while debatable, compels this reviewer's assent.
Webb, Esq., a colored man, author of the somewhat famous book entitled 'The Garies,' published in London in 1858, with prefaces by Lord Brougham and Mrs.