preferentialism


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pref·er·en·tial

 (prĕf′ə-rĕn′shəl)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or giving advantage or preference: preferential treatment.
2. Manifesting or originating from partiality or preference: preferential tariff rates.

pref′er·en′tial·ism n.
pref′er·en′tial·ist n.
pref′er·en′tial·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

preferentialism

(ˌprɛfəˈrɛnʃəlɪzəm)
n
(Economics) old-fashioned the economic system of preference, esp amongst British commonwealth countries
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

preferentialism

the policy of giving preferential treatment in international trade. — preferentialist, n.
See also: Trade
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Economic cooperation foresees some degree of commercial preferentialism, but with harmonised domestic rules.
Barring the political drama, the dissent of party members against preferentialism in nominations in the case of Tessori, was ultimately considered and conceded to, a demonstration of how egalitarian politics can be the tenet of political parties.
In addition to a historical/legal argument for Israel's right to exist, if any religious preferentialism constitutes a basis for delegitimizing Israel's status as a sovereign nation, such preferentialism even more strongly delegitimizes the right to exist claimed by those Arab nations who refuse to recognize Israel's sovereignty.
(4) See Risto Saarinen, "After Rescher: Pluralism as Preferentialism," in Mortensen, Theology and the Religions, pp.
The surrounding chapter of Greenawalt's book serves to support one other principle as well, namely the rule against government preferentialism among religions.
This sort of ideological preferentialism is in serious tension with the Tocquevillian idea that private associations play a critical role in implementing American democracy.
This paper aims to do three things: (1) to show why Schroeder's arguments against proportionalism do not refute it; (2) to identify the real trouble with proportionalism; and (3) to suggest a better way of understanding it (preferentialism).
British preferential tariffs lasted as long as they suited the interests of the United Kingdom and former colonies (and most quotations from American sources after World War II about the evils of preferentialism were attacks on imperial preference rather than advocacy of economic liberalism which has never been instinctive in US economic thought).
ordinances, covenants, chapters) and it covers from confessionalism (Church-State union) to preferentialism (a principal Church and tolerance of other confessions).
This article explores the origins of PTAs and their rationale, the costs of preferentialism, the reasons for stasis in the WTO's negotiating functions, and a possible way forward for attaining greater coherence between the WTO and PTAs.
We are not sure whether Haybron would happily embrace this implication, which certainly deviates from many prominent accounts of welfare, in particular subjectivist accounts such as hedonism and preferentialism. Many consider welfare as inherently subjective.
In particular, the literature on preferentialism has offered at least four possible general solutions to the problem of differentiating self-interested from non-self-interested preferences.