preflame

preflame

(priːˈfleɪm)
adj
(General Physics) of the period before combustion
References in periodicals archive ?
[32.] Jansons M, Lin S, Rhee K, "Infrared Spectral Analysis of Engine Preflame Emission." Int J of Eng Res 9(3):215-37 (2008) doi:10.1243/14680874JER00408.
Concentration, gas flow velocity, and flame temperature are measured for many runs to determine the range of inlet mixture temperature from point of complete evaporation to avoid condensation of fuel in mixing tube to maximum allowable inlet mixture temperature which affects flame stability where overheating of mixture and preflame reactions will reduce burning velocity.
The combustion of a fabric, or organic polymer, involves a preflame thermal degradation of the material, resulting in the evolution of flammable volatiles, and the gas phase pyrolysis or oxidation of the evolved gases.
It is considered that the function of substrate additives is to provide a source of "radical traps" to the gas phase where they may function either in the preflame or reaction zone regions of the flame.
Similarly, the preflame region of a polymethylmethacrylate candle flame contains appreciable levels of argon from the surrounding argon-oxygen atmosphere, together with incomplete combustion products such as CO and [H.sub.2] as shown in figure 6 [40.]
The model follows from the experiments of Wilson, et al., [42] where, in the presence of an inhibitor, the preflame zone is extended and the reaction zone narrows.
This is known to be a fast reaction under flame conditions and Fristrom and Sawyer [9] have demonstrated that it can effectively compete with the chain branching reaction in the preflame region.
Such a reaction relies on the presence of fuel (RH) and hence can only function in the preflame mixture.
[28.] Jansons, M., Lin, S., and Rhee, K., "Infrared spectral analysis of engine preflame emission," International Journal of Engine Research, 9(3):215-237, 2008.
As such, the chosen coordinates cover the preflame, liftoff, and postflame regions.
[IT.sub.CS] is mostly balanced by [IT.sub.C,x] and [IT.sub.MM] in the preflame regions, with the former being more dominant.
Sturgis and his coworkers pointed out that preflame reactions exert an important effect on fuel ignition and help to explain the trends shown.