prehistory

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pre·his·to·ry

 (prē-hĭs′tə-rē)
n. pl. pre·his·to·ries
1. History of humankind in the period before recorded history.
2. The circumstances or developments leading up to or surrounding an event or situation; background: "[He] then told me the curious prehistory of his obsessive interest in the seduction theory" (Janet Malcolm).

pre′his·tor′i·an (-hĭ-stôr′ē-ən, -stŏr′-) n.

prehistory

(priːˈhɪstərɪ)
n, pl -ries
1. (Archaeology) the prehistoric period
2. (Archaeology) the study of this period, relying entirely on archaeological evidence
prehistorian n

pre•his•to•ry

(priˈhɪs tə ri, -ˈhɪs tri)

n., pl. -ries.
1. human history in the period before recorded events, known mainly through archaeological discoveries, study, research, etc.
2. a history of the events or circumstances leading to something.
[1870–75]
pre`his•to′ri•an (-hɪˈstɔr i ən, -ˈstoʊr-) n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.prehistory - the time during the development of human culture before the appearance of the written wordprehistory - the time during the development of human culture before the appearance of the written word
period, period of time, time period - an amount of time; "a time period of 30 years"; "hastened the period of time of his recovery"; "Picasso's blue period"
Bronze Age - (archeology) a period between the Stone and Iron Ages, characterized by the manufacture and use of bronze tools and weapons
Iron Age - (archeology) the period following the Bronze Age; characterized by rapid spread of iron tools and weapons
Stone Age - (archeology) the earliest known period of human culture, characterized by the use of stone implements
glacial epoch, glacial period, ice age - any period of time during which glaciers covered a large part of the earth's surface; "the most recent ice age was during the Pleistocene"
Translations
pravěk
prapovijestpretpovijest

prehistory

[ˈpriːˈhɪstərɪ] Nprehistoria f

prehistory

[ˌpriːˈhɪstəri] npréhistoire fpre-industrial [ˌpriːɪnˈdʌstriəl] preindustrial (US) adjpréindustriel(le)

prehistory

prehistory

[ˌpriːˈhɪstrɪ] npreistoria
References in periodicals archive ?
Bednarik, the Australian prehistorian and cognitive archaeologist, said: "The carvings and drawings on rocks can be viewed and discussed using radioactive carbon and colors in order to discover the dates and information they convey.
1994): The meaning of death: funerary beliefs and the prehistorian.
Paul Garwood, senior lecturer in Archaeology at the University of Birmingham, and the principal prehistorian on the project, said: "The extraordinary scale, detail and novelty of the evidence produced by the Stonehenge Hidden Landscapes Project, which the new discoveries at Durrington Walls exemplify, is changing fundamentally our understanding of Stonehenge and the world around it.
In other words, as the prehistorian Henry de Lumley-Woodyear states: "It implies the conception of models and the emergence of conceptual thinking" (1999: 173 author's translation).
Enter prehistorian Klint Janulis: "We don't have a record of how Stone Age communities dealt with internal conflict and justice.
In contrast, prehistorian Margaret Ehrenberg rightly reminds us that the oldest of the figurines date back to Palaeolithic times when people were all hunter-gatherers; and foragers even much later have generally been shamanic and animist, worshipping spirits of nature, not personified 'gods/goddesses'.
Using the trope of "the great man"--and no Polynesian prehistorian has made greater impacts than Pat--Kirch crafts a very good story.
The 1960s saw a revolution in the situation of archaeology in Australia and John no longer the sole university prehistorian.
He had grasped that, in the arid inland, 'it is seasonal reliability or variability of rainfall, and not its average, which is the true gauge to the ecological situation', as the prehistorian of Australia, John Mulvaney, has put it.
An Old World prehistorian, Marshall has documented evidence of the donkey's domestic service by looking at skeletal wear and tear of animal remains found entombed near Egyptian pharaohs.
There is a powerful lobby, whose most prominent spokesman in Britain is the prehistorian Professor Lord (Colin) Renfrew, which argues that such works should be neither collected nor published, perhaps not even conserved.
The prehistorian, like any other historian, should aim not 'only to describe, but also to explain: historical description should be at the same time explanatory.