prehistory


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pre·his·to·ry

 (prē-hĭs′tə-rē)
n. pl. pre·his·to·ries
1. History of humankind in the period before recorded history.
2. The circumstances or developments leading up to or surrounding an event or situation; background: "[He] then told me the curious prehistory of his obsessive interest in the seduction theory" (Janet Malcolm).

pre′his·tor′i·an (-hĭ-stôr′ē-ən, -stŏr′-) n.

prehistory

(priːˈhɪstərɪ)
n, pl -ries
1. (Archaeology) the prehistoric period
2. (Archaeology) the study of this period, relying entirely on archaeological evidence
prehistorian n

pre•his•to•ry

(priˈhɪs tə ri, -ˈhɪs tri)

n., pl. -ries.
1. human history in the period before recorded events, known mainly through archaeological discoveries, study, research, etc.
2. a history of the events or circumstances leading to something.
[1870–75]
pre`his•to′ri•an (-hɪˈstɔr i ən, -ˈstoʊr-) n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.prehistory - the time during the development of human culture before the appearance of the written wordprehistory - the time during the development of human culture before the appearance of the written word
period, period of time, time period - an amount of time; "a time period of 30 years"; "hastened the period of time of his recovery"; "Picasso's blue period"
Bronze Age - (archeology) a period between the Stone and Iron Ages, characterized by the manufacture and use of bronze tools and weapons
Iron Age - (archeology) the period following the Bronze Age; characterized by rapid spread of iron tools and weapons
Stone Age - (archeology) the earliest known period of human culture, characterized by the use of stone implements
glacial epoch, glacial period, ice age - any period of time during which glaciers covered a large part of the earth's surface; "the most recent ice age was during the Pleistocene"
Translations
pravěk
prapovijestpretpovijest

prehistory

[ˈpriːˈhɪstərɪ] Nprehistoria f

prehistory

[ˌpriːˈhɪstəri] npréhistoire fpre-industrial [ˌpriːɪnˈdʌstriəl] preindustrial (US) adjpréindustriel(le)

prehistory

prehistory

[ˌpriːˈhɪstrɪ] npreistoria
References in periodicals archive ?
The potential to revise our approach to prehistory in the light of new conceptual developments within the discipline, touched upon here with respect to agriculture, are equally applicable to other realms of archaeological practice.
The extinction during the Late Devonian period is widely considered one of the five massive extinctions in Earth's prehistory. The die-off climaxed at the end of the period's Frasnian stage, which lasted from around 385 million to 375 million years ago.
Start with the vacation-worthy thought of drawing the Milky Way every night while at sea, and extend that to the concept of being in an absolutely elemental environment that is constantly changing but that remains visually unchanged, as it has from prehistory to the present.
They will be instrumental in helping the Kanaks achieve her husband's ambition of telling 'the world that we are neither escapees from prehistory nor archaeological remains, but men of flesh and blood'.(6)
Ferguson provides an enticing taste of some perceptions of prehistory expressed by English Renaissance writers, yet readers will finish with the desire for a full plate.
General procurement notice for Supply and installation for the provision of scientific-technical equipment of the research area of the Laboratory of Archeology and Prehistory of the University of Cdiz
Her topics are perspectives on egalitarian societies, modeling late prehistory in the region, monuments and tribal ritual organization, mounds as intratribal ceremonial monuments, the Missaukee earthworks and Bear's journey, contextualizing the regional ritual landscape of late prehistory, and breaking out of the savage slot.
Overall, this is an impressive collection that represents important state-of-the-art, international, multi-disciplinary research on prehistory in Oceania and its connections to Southeast Asia.
The French fossil jaw shows that, beginning deep in prehistory, Neandertals exhibited a humanlike propensity to aid their debilitated comrades, says anthropologist Erik Trinkaus of Washington University in St.
Andy Goldsworthy's outdoor art has prehistory in the American Earthworks of artists like Michael Heizer and Robert Smithson and in the more delicate strain of land art made by Goldsworthy's British compatriots, notably Richard Long and Hamish Fulton.
Alan Gabbey discusses mechanics and warns that there is more to the story of mechanical science than is found in tracking the prehistory of Newtonian mechanics.
Tenders are invited for Production and graphic design of an already existing series of publications collections in the museum of prehistory and early history in 3 other volumes for the staatliche museen zu berlin preuischer kulturbesitz