prejudicate

prejudicate

(prɪˈdʒuːdɪˌkeɪt)
vb (tr)
to judge beforehand
References in periodicals archive ?
The Chorus announces that "tales heard with 'ear prejudicate' spoil judgment and corrupt the sense." Ears must be on guard against false rumors.
Alluding more directly to the story of the Fall, the Chorus earlier describes the tragic consequences of willful interpretation and deterministic perceptions: To hear a tale with ears prejudicate, It spoils the judgment, and corrupts the sense: That human error, given to every state, Is greater enemy to innocence.
In Actes and Monuments Foxe's citations to texts are rarely to the Hebrew Bible, and Foxe denied that prophecies of ancient Israel held for modern-day England: "the Prophecies of the old Testament, if they bee taken in theyr proper and native sense, after my judgement, do extend no further, then to the death of our Saviour, and to the end of the Jewes kyngdome." Foxe hedges a bit on this, however, "Albeit herein I do not prejudicate to any mans opinion, but that every man may abounde in his owne sense" (872).