prejudiced


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prej·u·dice

 (prĕj′ə-dĭs)
n.
1.
a. The act or state of holding unreasonable preconceived judgments or convictions: "This is not actually a volume of the best short stories ... These are just the stories that I like best, and I am full of prejudice and strong opinions" (Ann Patchett).
b. An adverse judgment or opinion formed unfairly or without knowledge of the facts: a boy with a prejudice against unfamiliar foods.
2. Irrational suspicion or hatred of a particular social group, such as a race or the adherents of a religion.
3.
a. Detriment or harm caused to a person, especially in a legal case: The delay operated to her prejudice.
b. Preclusionary effect, preventing further pursuit of one's interests: The case was dismissed with prejudice.
tr.v. prej·u·diced, prej·u·dic·ing, prej·u·dic·es
1. To fill with prejudice or cause to judge with prejudice. See Synonyms at bias.
2. To affect detrimentally or harmfully by a judgment or act.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin praeiūdicium : prae-, pre- + iūdicium, judgment (from iūdex, iūdic-, judge; see deik- in Indo-European roots).]

prejudiced

(ˈprɛdʒʊdɪst)
adj
having an opinion formed beforehand, esp an unfavourable one based on inadequate factsintolerant of or disliking people of a specific race, religion, etc
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.prejudiced - emanating from a person's emotions and prejudices
subjective - taking place within the mind and modified by individual bias; "a subjective judgment"
2.prejudiced - being biased or having a belief or attitude formed beforehand; "a prejudiced judge"
unprejudiced, impartial - free from undue bias or preconceived opinions; "an unprejudiced appraisal of the pros and cons"; "the impartial eye of a scientist"

prejudiced

adjective biased, influenced, unfair, one-sided, conditioned, partial, partisan, discriminatory, bigoted, intolerant, opinionated, narrow-minded, jaundiced, prepossessed Some landlords and landladies are racially prejudiced.
just, fair, neutral, open-minded, impartial, unbiased, not prejudiced, not bigoted

prejudiced

adjective
Translations
مُتَحَامِلمُتَحَيِّز، مُتَحامِل
předpojatý
fordomsfuldforudindtaget
ennakkoluuloinen
pun predrasuda
fordómafullur
偏見をもった
편견을 가진
predpojatý
poln predsodkov
fördomsfull
มีอคติ
ön yargılıönyargılı
có thành kiến

prejudiced

[ˈpredʒʊdɪst] ADJ [view] → parcial, interesado
he's very prejudicedtiene muchos prejuicios
to be prejudiced against sth/sbestar predispuesto en contra de algo/algn
to be prejudiced in favour of sth/sbestar predispuesto a favor de algo/algn

prejudiced

[ˈprɛdʒʊdɪst] adj
[person] → plein(e) de préjugés
to be racially prejudiced → avoir des préjugés raciaux
I'm not prejudiced → je n'ai pas de préjugés
to be prejudiced against sb → avoir un parti pris contre qn, avoir des préjugés contre qn
to be prejudiced against sth → avoir un parti pris contre qch, avoir des préjugés contre qch
to be prejudiced in favour of sb [person] → avoir un parti pris en faveur de qn; [legislation] → faire preuve de parti pris en faveur de qn
to be prejudiced in favour of sth [person] → avoir un parti pris en faveur de qch
... but I'm prejudiced (humorous)... mais je ne suis pas objectif
[information] → partial(e); [view] → préconçu(e), partial(e); [result] → faussé(e)

prejudiced

adj personvoreingenommen (against gegen); opinionvorgefasst; judgebefangen; to be prejudiced in favour of somebody/somethingfür jdn/etw voreingenommen sein; to be racially prejudicedRassenvorurteile haben

prejudiced

[ˈprɛdʒʊdɪst] adj (person) → pieno/a di pregiudizi, prevenuto/a; (racially) → pieno/a di pregiudizi; (view, opinion) → preconcetto/a
to be prejudiced against sb/sth → essere prevenuto/a contro qn/qc
to be prejudiced in favour of sb/sth → essere ben disposto/a verso qn/qc

prejudice

(ˈpredʒədis) noun
(an) opinion or feeling for or especially against something, formed unfairly or unreasonably ie without proper knowledge. The jury must listen to his statement without prejudice; Is racial prejudice (= dislike of people because of their race) increasing in this country?
verb
1. to cause to feel prejudice for or against something.
2. to harm or endanger (a person's position, prospects etc) in some way. Your terrible handwriting will prejudice your chances of passing the exam.
ˈprejudiced adjective
having or showing prejudice. a prejudiced attitude to people of other races; Don't be so prejudiced.

prejudiced

مُتَحَامِل předpojatý fordomsfuld voreingenommen προκατειλημμένος predispuesto, tener prejuicios ennakkoluuloinen partial pun predrasuda prevenuto 偏見をもった 편견을 가진 bevooroordeeld forutinntatt uprzedzony preconceituoso предвзятый fördomsfull มีอคติ önyargılı có thành kiến 怀偏见的
References in classic literature ?
Vernon would allow something to my affection for herself and her husband in the length of my visit, she would do more justice to us all; but my sister is unhappily prejudiced beyond the hope of conviction against Lady Susan.
It is scarcely the province of an author to refute the arguments of his censors and vindicate his own productions; but I may be allowed to make here a few observations with which I would have prefaced the first edition, had I foreseen the necessity of such precautions against the misapprehensions of those who would read it with a prejudiced mind or be content to judge it by a hasty glance.
Pardon me," said he; "but the instant your Majesty considers me a prejudiced judge, I withdraw.
And you would feel as I do, Tom, if you were not prejudiced against those young fellows.
Of neither Darcy nor Wickham could she think without feeling she had been blind, partial, prejudiced, absurd.
I do not know Scarlett Trent, and I frankly admit that I am prejudiced against him and all his class.
Here I was accosted one day by an inhabitant of that place, where he had found the people so prejudiced against us, who desired to be admitted to confession.
An individual difference measure of motivation to control prejudiced reactions.
Some northerners are prejudiced against southerners; some southerners are prejudiced against northerners.
People commonly believe that children's and adolescents' prejudiced attitudes are simply reflections of their parents' attitudes.
This is consistent with the notion that notices containing technical defects are valid if the taxpayer has not been prejudiced or misled by the error and is afforded a meaningful opportunity to litigate his claims.
Moreover, Lead Plaintiffs believe that the Class will not be prejudiced as no members of the Class are barred from pursuing their own individual claims against defendants if they so choose.