prejudicial


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prej·u·di·cial

 (prĕj′ə-dĭsh′əl)
adj.
1. Causing or tending to cause harm, especially to a legal case: a prejudicial error.
2. Showing or full of prejudice; biased: a prejudicial opinion.

prej′u·di′cial·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

prejudicial

(ˌprɛdʒʊˈdɪʃəl)
adj
causing prejudice; detrimental or damaging
ˌprejuˈdicially adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

prej•u•di•cial

(ˌprɛdʒ əˈdɪʃ əl)

adj.
causing prejudice or disadvantage; detrimental.
[1375–1425; late Middle English < Late Latin]
prej`u•di′cial•ly, adv.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.prejudicial - (sometimes followed by `to') causing harm or injury; "damaging to career and reputation"; "the reporter's coverage resulted in prejudicial publicity for the defendant"
harmful - causing or capable of causing harm; "too much sun is harmful to the skin"; "harmful effects of smoking"
2.prejudicial - tending to favor preconceived ideas; "the presence of discriminatory or prejudicial attitudes in the white population"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

prejudicial

adjective harmful, damaging, undermining, detrimental, hurtful, unfavourable, counterproductive, deleterious, injurious, inimical, disadvantageous eight years in jail for actions considered prejudicial to security
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

prejudicial

adjective
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

prejudicial

[ˌpredʒʊˈdɪʃəl] ADJperjudicial (to para) it would be prejudicial to her careersería perjudicial para or perjudicaría a su carrera
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

prejudicial

[ˌprɛdʒʊˈdɪʃəl] adjpréjudiciable
prejudicial to sth → préjudiciable à qch
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

prejudicial

adjabträglich (→ to sth einer Sache dat); to be prejudicial to a causeeiner Sache (dat)schaden; to be prejudicial to somebody’s interestsjds Chancen gefährden
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

prejudicial

[ˌprɛdʒʊˈdɪʃl] adj prejudicial (to)pregiudizievole (per or a)
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
From the name of my patron, indeed, I hope my reader will be convinced, at his very entrance on this work, that he will find in the whole course of it nothing prejudicial to the cause of religion and virtue, nothing inconsistent with the strictest rules of decency, nor which can offend even the chastest eye in the perusal.
"Senor," replied Sancho, "let your worship send all such oaths to the devil, for they are very pernicious to salvation and prejudicial to the conscience; just tell me now, if for several days to come we fall in with no man armed with a helmet, what are we to do?
These are not considered prejudicial to health, since both the natives and the whites sleep in the open air with perfect impunity.
For if it happened that an individual, even when asleep, had some very distinct idea, as, for example, if a geometer should discover some new demonstration, the circumstance of his being asleep would not militate against its truth; and as for the most ordinary error of our dreams, which consists in their representing to us various objects in the same way as our external senses, this is not prejudicial, since it leads us very properly to suspect the truth of the ideas of sense; for we are not infrequently deceived in the same manner when awake; as when persons in the jaundice see all objects yellow, or when the stars or bodies at a great distance appear to us much smaller than they are.
The members of the confederacy are expressly restricted from entering into compacts prejudicial to the empire; from imposing tolls and duties on their mutual intercourse, without the consent of the emperor and diet; from altering the value of money; from doing injustice to one another; or from affording assistance or retreat to disturbers of the public peace.
"Talking," the elder man remarked with a slight shrug of his shoulders, "will never have a prejudicial effect upon my health.
There was no deep insight into causes and effects necessary to foresee that such a situation of things was likely to prove highly prejudicial to their future movements.
He laughed at my "odd kind of arithmetic," as he was pleased to call it, "in reckoning the numbers of our people, by a computation drawn from the several sects among us, in religion and politics." He said, "he knew no reason why those, who entertain opinions prejudicial to the public, should be obliged to change, or should not be obliged to conceal them.
Some of the older courtiers remembered having seen his father, but their recollections were not prejudicial to the son.
Trumbull and every one else, whose appearance, however, led to the supposition that he might be a relative of the horse-dealer's-- also "given to indulgence." His large whiskers, imposing swagger, and swing of the leg, made him a striking figure; but his suit of black, rather shabby at the edges, caused the prejudicial inference that he was not able to afford himself as much indulgence as he liked.
In delivering this charge to Tinkler, Mr Dorrit looked severely at him, and also kept a jealous eye upon him until he went out at the door, mistrusting that he might have something in his mind prejudicial to the family dignity; that he might have even got wind of some Collegiate joke before he came into the service, and might be derisively reviving its remembrance at the present moment.
I fear that the incident must have a very prejudicial effect upon his career."