prelate


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

prel·ate

 (prĕl′ĭt)
n.
A high-ranking member of the clergy, especially a bishop.

[Middle English prelat, from Old French, from Medieval Latin praelātus, from Latin, past participle of praeferre, to carry before, to prefer : prae-, pre- + lātus, brought; see telə- in Indo-European roots.]

pre·lat′ic (prĭ-lăt′ĭk) adj.

prelate

(ˈprɛlɪt)
n
(Ecclesiastical Terms) a Church dignitary of high rank, such as a cardinal, bishop, or abbot
[C13: from Old French prélat, from Church Latin praelātus, from Latin praeferre to hold in special esteem, prefer]
prelatic, preˈlatical adj

prel•ate

(ˈprɛl ɪt)

n.
an ecclesiastic of a high order, as an archbishop or a bishop; a church dignitary.
[1175–1225; Middle English prelat < Medieval Latin praelātus, Latin: a dignitary, n. use of past participle of praeferre to give precedence to, prefer]
prel′ate•ship`, n.
pre•lat•ic (prɪˈlæt ɪk) adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.prelate - a senior clergyman and dignitaryprelate - a senior clergyman and dignitary  
priest - a clergyman in Christian churches who has the authority to perform or administer various religious rites; one of the Holy Orders
Translations

prelate

[ˈprelɪt] Nprelado m

prelate

[ˈprɛlət] nprélat m

prelate

nPrälat m

prelate

[ˈprɛlɪt] nprelato
References in classic literature ?
D'Artagnan and Porthos walked straight up to the episcopal palace, which was surrounded by a numerous crowd anxious to see the prelate return.
Then my lord Bishop of Hereford came in, last of all, to say a ponderous grace and take his seat on the other side of the Sheriff--the prelate's fat body showing up in goodly contrast to the other's lean bones.
What have we to do with this mitred prelate,--with this crowned king?
He rose, and the two long lines of brothers followed his example, looking sideways with scared faces at the angry prelate.
It needed but that to add fresh fuel to the fiery mood of the prelate.
For, instead of a long train with royal diadems, I saw in one family two fiddlers, three spruce courtiers, and an Italian prelate. In another, a barber, an abbot, and two cardinals.
``May I so find mercy in your eyes,'' said the Jew, ``as I know not one word which the reverend prelate spake to me all this fearful night.
At the next meeting, the Bishop of Salisbury, looking over the work, suddenly sprang to his feet and said with considerable excitement: "Gentlemen, somebody has been razing 'Hell' here!" Years afterward the good prelate's death was made sweet by the reflection that he had been the means (under Providence) of making an important, serviceable and immortal addition to the phraseology of the English tongue.
It was gravely said by some of the prelates in the Council of Trent, where the doctrine of the Schoolmen bare great sway, that the Schoolmen were like astronomers, which did feign eccentrics and epicycles, and such engines of orbs, to save the phenomena; though they knew there were no such things; and in like manner, that the Schoolmen had framed a number of subtle and intricate axioms, and theorems, to save the practice of the church.
For whenever these factions have their cardinals they do not remain quiet for long, because cardinals foster the factions in Rome and out of it, and the barons are compelled to support them, and thus from the ambitions of prelates arise disorders and tumults among the barons.
By Peter, you shall die, Unless you bring them forth immediately!-- Hale them to prison, lade their limbs with gyves.-- False prelates, for this hateful treachery Curs'd be your souls to hellish misery!
Of this famous house, some of the greatest noblemen, prelates, and dignitaries in England are governors: and as the boys are very comfortably lodged, fed, and educated, and subsequently inducted to good scholarships at the University and livings in the Church, many little gentlemen are devoted to the ecclesiastical profession from their tenderest years, and there is considerable emulation to procure nominations for the foundation.