prelate

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prel·ate

 (prĕl′ĭt)
n.
A high-ranking member of the clergy, especially a bishop.

[Middle English prelat, from Old French, from Medieval Latin praelātus, from Latin, past participle of praeferre, to carry before, to prefer : prae-, pre- + lātus, brought; see telə- in Indo-European roots.]

pre·lat′ic (prĭ-lăt′ĭk) adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

prelate

(ˈprɛlɪt)
n
(Ecclesiastical Terms) a Church dignitary of high rank, such as a cardinal, bishop, or abbot
[C13: from Old French prélat, from Church Latin praelātus, from Latin praeferre to hold in special esteem, prefer]
prelatic, preˈlatical adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

prel•ate

(ˈprɛl ɪt)

n.
an ecclesiastic of a high order, as an archbishop or a bishop; a church dignitary.
[1175–1225; Middle English prelat < Medieval Latin praelātus, Latin: a dignitary, n. use of past participle of praeferre to give precedence to, prefer]
prel′ate•ship`, n.
pre•lat•ic (prɪˈlæt ɪk) adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.prelate - a senior clergyman and dignitaryprelate - a senior clergyman and dignitary  
priest - a clergyman in Christian churches who has the authority to perform or administer various religious rites; one of the Holy Orders
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

prelate

[ˈprelɪt] Nprelado m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

prelate

[ˈprɛlət] nprélat m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

prelate

nPrälat m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

prelate

[ˈprɛlɪt] nprelato
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
He acquired a reputation for having a "prelatical" side and a "weakness for people of rank or importance" (Lockhart 328), and his personality was said to combine "unctuousness with snobbery in a way that left a bad taste in many people's mouths" (Hastings 251).
He spoke out fiercely in parliament against Danby's plans to establish what he termed the "monstrum horrendum" of a prelatical "oligarchy," (28) and was listed as "thrice worthy," along with Rochester, in one of the rosters Shaftesbury compiled of members of parliament who could be relied on to vote for Exclusion.
When he titled one of his pamphlets Of Prelatical Episcopacy, his point was that "prelatical episcopacy" is an oxymoron, not a tautology.
degrees; that the pretext for Milton's famously being "Church-outed" pertained to the fact that prelatical "tyranny had invaded the Church" (CPW I.822-23); and that in Of True Religion (1673), Milton's last bid to preserve the Commonwealth, the Puritan Independent did not deem it repugnant to draw upon the authority of no less than four of these Articles in his appeal for the consolidation of "all Protestant Churches" on "the main Principles of true Religion" (CPW VIII.419-420).