preliterary

preliterary

(priːˈlɪtərərɪ)
adj
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) occurring before the existence of literature
References in periodicals archive ?
Shklovsky declared that the story is not an artistic element but a preliterary material; only the discourse was for him an aesthetic construction.
Mainly concerned with the relationship of history and autobiography, Popkin leaves open the question whether narrative, as a basic preliterary experience of human beings, is "rooted in reality itself" or is "a fundamental aspect of human culture" (p.
Moreover, even phonetic processes accompanying the reduction and loss of some stem formatives in Preliterary Old English (henceforth POE), such as i-umlaut, did not produce alternations that could be used to identify reflexes of Proto-Germanic paradigms (as, e.
Further, I wonder exactly how those rules operated in preliterary Germanic Europe, whose folkways were at least as obscure to the insular Anglo-Saxon as they are to us today.
John and Sheehan agree that folcriht represents part of the Anglo-Saxons' native Germanic heritage; they also agree that these implicit folkways, vestiges of a preliterary society, remain very obscure to us today.
92) This scenario is worth considering, especially since in a preliterary matriclan the uncle and nephew would share the same unilineal totem and unilocal residence, thus forming a tight configuration, a "true atom of kinship.
Broadly, tribe specifies a premarket, preindustrial, and often preliterary culture, usually organized in small, contiguous, frequently factitious kin groups, where family is indistinguishable from polity.
To fathom this culture we must dig for its preliterary foundation.
Both held that these chroniclers copied down public, preliterary chronicles which local officials maintained as a public record.
Conroy's section "The Preliterary Period," provides the student with good information, especially the writers' profiles and the cautious comparisons to contemporary Scandinavian literature.