prelogical

prelogical

(priːˈlɒdʒɪkəl)
adj
(Psychology) occurring before the development of logic
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
Nigeria is in darkness, far away from civilization, because the country runs a primitive, prelogical body politic devoid of responsibility and restitution.
To be concise, the organological marks a theoretical moment or sense of a relation between life and thought that is not equivalent to the one between prelogical and logical.
For Kleiman, the series "Murder of King Duncan," "Bullfight," 1931, and "Despair," 1937, are nothing less than a kind of "visual diary of [Eisenstein's] inner life." He does not regard them, however, merely as confessional or as sublimations of perverse, prelogical impulses.
French philosopher Lucien Levy-Bruhl (1857-1939) explained the religious and magical beliefs of the African people in terms of a "prelogical" mentality, one that does not always conform to the laws of logic.
Such conclusions are grounded partially in Fried's belief that Western Europeans gradually had to overcome a prelogical, symbolic worldview before embracing reason.
In her treatment of "Sandunga," which shows dance and other customs associated with courtship of the Tehuantepec region, she discusses Eisenstein's thinking on gender and his idea of "prelogical" or "sensuous" thought, which would forma centerpiece in his writings of the 1930s and 1940s concerning film as a synthesis between such prelogical categories and modern, analytic ones.
Ritual mimetism, as Lucien Levy-Bruhl remarks, derives from a well-rooted pattern of "prelogical" mentality: the image is consubstantial with the original and vice versa (13).
Somewhere around two years of age, they are able to switch from dealing with the world in this very physical way to dealing with the world by "using their heads" and they become "thinkers." However, from roughly two to seven years of age, they are in the "pre-operational" or "prelogical" stage.
He goes as far to renounce the accepted meaning of the term "primitive" itself--"there is no such thing as a 'primitive mind', a 'magical' or 'prelogical' way of thinking"--and insists "that each individual in 'primitive' society is a man, a woman, a child of the same kind, of the same way of thinking, feeling and acting as a man, woman or child in our own society" (1951/1927, p.
Rhys's nonlinear, subject-object collapsing, narrative techniques also evoke early anthropological (and modernist) associations with "the primitive." For example, they align quite closely with Lucien Levy-Bruhl's primitivist conception of the "prelogical" mind in his 1922 work of anthropology, La Mentalite Primitive.