prelude


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prel·ude

(prā′lo͞od′, -lyo͞od′; prĕl′o͞od′, -yo͞od′; prē′lo͞od′, -lyo͞od′)
n.
1. An introductory performance, event, or action preceding a more important one; a preliminary or preface.
2. Music
a. A piece or movement that serves as an introduction to another section or composition and establishes the key, such as one that precedes a fugue, opens a suite, or precedes a church service.
b. A similar but independent composition for the piano.
c. The overture to an oratorio, opera, or act of an opera.
d. A short composition of the 1400s and early 1500s written in a free style, usually for keyboard.
v. prel·ud·ed, prel·ud·ing, prel·udes
v. tr.
1. To serve as a prelude to.
2. To introduce with or as if with a prelude.
v. intr.
To serve as a prelude or introduction.

[Medieval Latin praelūdium, from Latin praelūdere, to play beforehand : prae-, pre- + lūdere, to play; see leid- in the Appendix of Indo-European roots.]

prel′ud′er n.
pre·lu′di·al (prĭ-lo͞o′dē-əl) adj.
Usage Note: How should prelude be pronounced? In our 2015 survey, 72 percent of the Usage Panel preferred a long a (pronounced "pray") and 25 percent a short e (pronounced "prell") for the first syllable. The absence or presence of a glide—a short (y) sound—after coronal consonants such as d, t, or l is a regional variation. People who pronounce duty as (do͞o′tē) also tend to omit the glide after the l in prelude: (prā′lo͞od′). Those who pronounce duty as (dyo͞o′tē) will tend to include the glide: (prā′lyo͞od′).

prelude

(ˈprɛljuːd)
n
1. (Music, other)
a. a piece of music that precedes a fugue, or forms the first movement of a suite, or an introduction to an act in an opera, etc
b. (esp for piano) a self-contained piece of music
2. something serving as an introduction or preceding event, occurrence, etc
vb
3. to serve as a prelude to (something)
4. (tr) to introduce by a prelude
[C16: (n) from Medieval Latin praelūdium, from prae before + -lūdium entertainment, from Latin lūdus play; (vb) from Late Latin praelūdere to play beforehand, rehearse, from lūdere to play]
preluder n
preˈludial adj
prelusion n
prelusive, prelusory adj
preˈlusively, preˈlusorily adv

prel•ude

(ˈprɛl yud, ˈpreɪl-, ˈpreɪ lud, ˈpri-)

n., v. -ud•ed, -ud•ing. n.
1. a preliminary to an action, event, condition, or work of broader scope and higher importance.
2. any action, event, comment, etc., that precedes something else.
3. Music.
a. a relatively short, independent instrumental composition, free in form and resembling an improvisation.
b. a piece that is introductory to another piece, as a fugue.
c. the overture to an opera.
d. music opening a church service; an introductory voluntary.
v.t.
4. to serve as a prelude or introduction to.
5. to introduce by a prelude.
6. to play as a prelude.
v.i.
7. to serve as a prelude.
8. to give a prelude.
9. to play a prelude.
[1555–65; < Medieval Latin praelūdium= Latin praelūd(ere) to compose a prelude (prae- pre- + lūdere to write for amusement, play) + -ium -ium1]

prelude


Past participle: preluded
Gerund: preluding

Imperative
prelude
prelude
Present
I prelude
you prelude
he/she/it preludes
we prelude
you prelude
they prelude
Preterite
I preluded
you preluded
he/she/it preluded
we preluded
you preluded
they preluded
Present Continuous
I am preluding
you are preluding
he/she/it is preluding
we are preluding
you are preluding
they are preluding
Present Perfect
I have preluded
you have preluded
he/she/it has preluded
we have preluded
you have preluded
they have preluded
Past Continuous
I was preluding
you were preluding
he/she/it was preluding
we were preluding
you were preluding
they were preluding
Past Perfect
I had preluded
you had preluded
he/she/it had preluded
we had preluded
you had preluded
they had preluded
Future
I will prelude
you will prelude
he/she/it will prelude
we will prelude
you will prelude
they will prelude
Future Perfect
I will have preluded
you will have preluded
he/she/it will have preluded
we will have preluded
you will have preluded
they will have preluded
Future Continuous
I will be preluding
you will be preluding
he/she/it will be preluding
we will be preluding
you will be preluding
they will be preluding
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been preluding
you have been preluding
he/she/it has been preluding
we have been preluding
you have been preluding
they have been preluding
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been preluding
you will have been preluding
he/she/it will have been preluding
we will have been preluding
you will have been preluding
they will have been preluding
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been preluding
you had been preluding
he/she/it had been preluding
we had been preluding
you had been preluding
they had been preluding
Conditional
I would prelude
you would prelude
he/she/it would prelude
we would prelude
you would prelude
they would prelude
Past Conditional
I would have preluded
you would have preluded
he/she/it would have preluded
we would have preluded
you would have preluded
they would have preluded
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.prelude - something that serves as a preceding event or introduces what follows; "training is a necessary preliminary to employment"; "drinks were the overture to dinner"
inception, origination, origin - an event that is a beginning; a first part or stage of subsequent events
2.prelude - music that precedes a fugue or introduces an act in an opera
music - an artistic form of auditory communication incorporating instrumental or vocal tones in a structured and continuous manner
chorale prelude - a composition for organ using a chorale as a basis for variations
Verb1.prelude - serve as a prelude or opening to
serve, function - serve a purpose, role, or function; "The tree stump serves as a table"; "The female students served as a control group"; "This table would serve very well"; "His freedom served him well"; "The table functions as a desk"
2.prelude - play as a prelude
music - musical activity (singing or whistling etc.); "his music was his central interest"
spiel, play - replay (as a melody); "Play it again, Sam"; "She played the third movement very beautifully"

prelude

noun
1. introduction, beginning, preparation, preliminary, start, commencement, curtain-raiser The protests are now seen as the prelude to last year's uprising.
2. overture, opening, introduction, introductory movement the third-act Prelude of Parsifal

prelude

noun
A short section of preliminary remarks:
Translations
تَمْهيد، مُقَدِّمَهمُقَدِّمَه موسيقيَّه
preludi
předehrapreludiumúvod
indledningpræludium
elõjátékelõzményprelúdium
forspilundanfari
preliudas
iesākumsievadsprelūdija
prelúdium
girişprelüt

prelude

[ˈpreljuːd]
A. Npreludio m (also Mus) (to de)
B. VTpreludiar

prelude

[ˈprɛljuːd] n
(MUSIC)prélude m
(fig)prélude m
a prelude to sth → un prélude à qch

prelude

nVorspiel nt; (Mus: = introduction to fugue) → Präludium nt; (fig)Auftakt m
vteinleiten, den Auftakt (+gen)bilden

prelude

[ˈprɛljuːd] npreludio

prelude

(ˈpreljuːd) noun
1. an event etc that goes before, and acts as an introduction to, something.
2. a piece of music played as an introduction to the main piece.
References in classic literature ?
In one of his long poems called The Prelude, which is a history of his own young life, he tells of these happy childish hours.
Brilliant performance of prelude to the Judge's song in "Trial by Jury" by nervous Pianist.
The Communists turn their attention chiefly to Germany, because that country is on the eve of a bourgeois revolution that is bound to be carried out under more advanced conditions of European civilisation, and with a much more developed proletariat, than that of England was in the seventeenth, and of France in the eighteenth century, and because the bourgeois revolution in Germany will be but the prelude to an immediately following proletarian revolution.
And so, whether our conclusion be true or false, let us assume all this, and proceed at once from the prelude or preamble to the chief strain, and describe that in like manner.
a) After the prelude, which Pausanias failed to find in the ancient copy engraved on lead seen by him on Mt.
The knight in the meantime, had brought the strings into some order, and after a short prelude, asked his host whether he would choose a sirvente in the language of oc, or a lai in the language of oui, or a virelai, or a ballad in the vulgar English.
Think well of this, abbe, Lyodot and D'Eymeris at Vincennes are a prelude of ruin for my house.
So far her improvement was sufficient -- and in many other points she came on exceedingly well; for though she could not write sonnets, she brought herself to read them; and though there seemed no chance of her throwing a whole party into raptures by a prelude on the pianoforte, of her own composition, she could listen to other people's performance with very little fatigue.
The perfect swarm of busily engaged persons moving about noiselessly; the multitude of guests, - who were, however, even less numerous than the servants who waited on them, - the myriad of exquisitely prepared dishes, of gold and silver vases; the floods of dazzling light, the masses of unknown flowers of which the hot-houses had been despoiled, redundant with luxuriance of unequaled scent and beauty; the perfect harmony of the surroundings, which, indeed, was no more than the prelude of the promised
But thereupon he immediately began to prelude, and fell into the tune which he knew would be taken as a special compliment by Mr.
In a few minutes he lifted his head, looked at me, and struck the first notes--the prelude to the song.
The feminine graduates-to-be were seated in their own bedrooms, dressed with a completeness of detail to which all their past lives seemed to have been but a prelude.