premedieval

premedieval

(ˌpriːmɛdɪˈiːvəl)
adj
(Historical Terms) occurring before the Medieval period
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Mr Bennett, who last week was elected to lead Ukip in the Assembly, ignited further controversy when he described women wearing the veil as "apparitions of premedieval culture".
Here's a dramatic view of premedieval trading routes that genius 18th century landscaper Capability Brown would have seen when he first had the idea for Broadway Tower.
Soto-Bruna estima que la caracteristica del neoplatonismo chartriano fue la <<coimplicacion entre los grados del conocimiento y los grados de ser>>, nota propia, por otra parte, del neoplatonismo premedieval (piensese, por ejemplo, en Juan Escoto Eriugena).
"It may be a ceremonial burial ship but it is definitely premedieval.
Helmer Glenn Casale ably guides a competent ensemble through these premedieval castle doings but doesn't muster the active dramatic throughline or onstage personnel to make viable Arthur's claim that his kingdom enjoyed "one brief shining moment" of glory.
[...] A second and very important group consists of historical fictions set in premedieval Britain [...].
According to Suwa, in Japan the premedieval exorcism gradually developed into the mugen-noh of prayers for the souls of the dead.
It currently seems to be expanding in at least four ways: an examination of premedieval texts (though not yet modern ones), the consideration of the socio-political dimensions of literary texts, the inclusion of "non-elite" and even "non-literary" texts, and a broadening and pluralizing of the notion of Japanese religion and its place in Asian religious thought.
Given these particular loci - so explaining Dante's singular divergence from classical authority (mostly Vergil), and thus the essential post-classical "originality" of his iconographic contribution - his Geryon will naturally not be so described by Natalis Comes (1551, 1576), for that author was a "scientific" mythographer, and thus he describes (Conti, 205: Mythologiae 7:1) the strictly Vergilian, or premedieval, standard.