premises


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prem·ise

 (prĕm′ĭs)
n. also prem·iss (prĕm′ĭs)
1. A proposition upon which an argument is based or from which a conclusion is drawn.
2. Logic
a. One of the propositions in a deductive argument.
b. Either the major or the minor proposition of a syllogism, from which the conclusion is drawn.
3. premises
a. Land, the buildings on it, or both the land and the buildings on it.
b. A building or particular portion of a building.
c. Law The part of a deed that states the details of the conveyance of the property.
v. prem·ised, prem·is·ing, prem·is·es
1. To provide a basis for; base: "The American Revolution had been premised on a tacit bargain that regional conflicts would be subordinated to the need for unity among the states" (Ron Chernow).
2. To state or assume as a proposition in an argument.
3. To state in advance as an introduction or explanation.

[Middle English premisse, from Old French, from Medieval Latin praemissa (propositiō), (the proposition) put before, premise, from Latin, feminine past participle of praemittere, to set in front : prae-, pre- + mittere, to send.]
Word History: Why do we call a single building the premises? To answer this question, we must go back to the Middle Ages. The English word premises comes from the Latin praemissa, which is both a feminine singular and a neuter plural form of praemissus, the past participle of praemittere, "to send in advance, utter by way of preface, place in front, prefix." In Medieval Latin, the feminine form praemissa was often used with the sense "logical premise" in philosophical discussions, while the neuter plural praemissa was often used with the sense "things mentioned before" in legal documents. Latin praemissa was borrowed into Old French as premisse and thence into Middle English. In Middle English legal documents, the plural premisses came to be used with the sense "the property, collectively, which is specified in the beginning of a legal document and which is conveyed, as by grant." By the first half of the 1700s, this use of the word had given rise to the modern sense of premises, "a building with its grounds or appurtenances."

premises

(ˈprɛmɪsɪz)
pl n
1. (Commerce) a piece of land together with its buildings, esp considered as a place of business
2. (Law) law
a. (in a deed, etc) the matters referred to previously; the aforesaid; the foregoing
b. the introductory part of a grant, conveyance, etc
3. (Law) law (in the US) the part of a bill in equity that states the names of the parties, details of the plaintiff's claims, etc
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.premises - land and the buildings on itpremises - land and the buildings on it; "bread is baked on the premises"; "the were evicted from the premises"
land site, site - the piece of land on which something is located (or is to be located); "a good site for the school"

premises

plural noun building(s), place, office, property, site, establishment The business has moved to new premises.
Translations
الـمَبْنَى وَالأَرَاضِي التَّابِعَه لَهُعِقار، المَنزِل والأراضي التابِعَه له
areálprostory
ejendomlokaliteter
alue
prostorije
épülethelyiség
svæîi
土地建物
부동산
telpas
förutsättningar
ที่ดินและสิ่งปลูกสร้าง
khuôn viên

premises

[ˈprɛmɪsɪz] npllocaux mpl
They're moving to new premises → Ils vont emménager dans de nouveaux locaux.
business premises → locaux commerciaux
the school premises → les locaux de l'école
on the premises (= in the place) → sur place (= in that place) → sur les lieux
The Director of the hostel lives on the premises → Le directeur de l'auberge vit sur place.
There is a kitchen on the premises → Il y a une cuisine sur place.
What were they doing on the premises at the weekend? → Que faisaient-ils sur les lieux pendant le week-end?

premises

[ˈprɛmɪsɪz] npllocale msg
on the premises → sul posto
he was asked to leave the premises → l'hanno invitato ad abbandonare il locale
business premises → locali commerciali

premises

(ˈpremisiz) noun plural
(a part of) a building and the area of ground belonging to it. These premises are used by the local football team.

premises

الـمَبْنَى وَالأَرَاضِي التَّابِعَه لَهُ prostory ejendom Gelände στεγασμένος χώρος local alue locaux prostorije locali 土地建物 부동산 huis eiendom lokal estabelecimento здание и прилегающая территория förutsättningar ที่ดินและสิ่งปลูกสร้าง bina ve etrafındaki arazi khuôn viên 地产
References in classic literature ?
I've been negotiating with this gentleman on behalf of Sir Leicester Dedlock, Baronet, and one way and another I've been in and out and about his premises a deal.
But the purchaser must remove the goods from the premises forthwith, to make room for three man- eating tigers, a cat-headed gorilla, and an armful of rattlesnakes.
My boy, I hope you will always defend your sister, and give anybody who insults her a good thrashing -- that is as it should be; but mind, I won't have any election blackguarding on my premises.
Pumblechook made out, after carefully surveying the premises, that he had first got upon the roof of the forge, and had then got upon the roof of the house, and had then let himself down the kitchen chimney by a rope made of his bedding cut into strips; and as Mr.
So you have been seeing the premises, seeing the premises-- premises--seeing the premises
I won't allow it; I won't have my premises spoiled.
Dunfer himself, through whose premises the ravine ran.
I accordingly informed the Indian that the lady of the house was out; and I warned him and his party off the premises.
Pullet began to give elaborate directions to Sally how to guard the premises from serious injury in the course of removing the dirt.
At one time, about five years after the disappearance, these stories of the supernatural became so rife, or through some attesting circumstances seemed so important, that some of Marion's most serious citizens deemed it well to investigate, and to that end arranged for a night session on the premises.
Your Honor," Watson said, "I would suggest that you ask him what he was doing on my premises.
said Fledgeby; 'I suppose you happen to know whose premises these are?