preparator


Also found in: Medical.

pre·par·a·tor

 (prĭ-păr′ə-tər, -pâr′-)
n.
One who prepares specimens or exhibits for scientific study or display, as in a museum.

preparator

(prɪˈpærətə)
n
(Medicine) archaic someone who prepares medicines or scientific specimens

pre•par•a•tor

(prɪˈpær ə tər, -ˈpɛər-)

n.
a person who prepares a specimen, as an animal, for scientific examination or exhibition.
[1755–65; < Late Latin]
References in periodicals archive ?
A year later, expert preparator Diane Scott had uncovered perfect embryonic skeletons.
Coming to curating through his expertise as a preparator, Glicksman saw his role in practical, hands-on terms as a technically adept facilitator enabling artists to physically realize environmental installations they wouldn't otherwise have the opportunity to make.
David worked for 10 years at the Ringling Museum as a conservation technician and preparator, spending two years on the restoration, re-gilding and installation of the Historic Asolo Theater.
Mark Clarke was once chief exhibit preparator at the University of Oregon Museum of Art, meaning he got to do a lot of hanging of paintings.
As the ROM's senior paleo preparator, he spends much of his time in the lab painstakingly releasing fossils from the rock they're embedded in.
More conventionally sculptural, the work nevertheless maintained the logic of the show by intimating autobiography while coolly offering evidence of labor and expenditure in its place, the white paint recalling the artist's other mundane work as a de facto gallery preparator. If some of these tactics looked familiar (Amanda Ross-Ho's studio recycling, Mike Kelley's adolescent recoveries, and Michael Asher's contextual play come to mind), they were: Wrinkle is clearly more invested in art's economy and circulation than in fulfilling any expectations of originality.
"Without a building, this is the next best thing," says Neugebauer, who is the museum's exhibit designer and chief preparator - that is, he is in charge of hanging the art.
Mark, the former chief preparator at the University of Oregon Museum of Art, was the framer and show hanger.
Four years in the making, the original exhibit was based on fieldwork done in March 1984 by a ROM team that included several artists and a mammal preparator who were also naturalists, a photographer, and a biology professor who specialized in bat echolocation--even a crew from the CBC was there to film the work for an episode of David Suzuki's The Nature of Things.

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