preponderate

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Related to preponderately: preponderantly

pre·pon·der·ate

 (prĭ-pŏn′də-rāt′)
intr.v. pre·pon·der·at·ed, pre·pon·der·at·ing, pre·pon·der·ates
1. To exceed something else in weight.
2. To be greater than something else, as in power, force, quantity, or importance; predominate: "In balancing his faults with his perfections, the latter seemed rather to preponderate" (Henry Fielding).
adj. (-dər-ĭt)
Preponderant.

[Latin praeponderāre, praeponderāt- : prae-, pre- + ponderāre, to weigh; see (s)pen- in Indo-European roots.]

pre·pon′der·ate·ly adv.
pre·pon′der·a′tion n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

preponderate

(prɪˈpɒndəˌreɪt)
vb (intr)
1. (often foll by over) to be more powerful, important, numerous, etc (than)
2. to be of greater weight than something else
[C17: from Late Latin praeponderāre to be of greater weight, from pondus weight]
preˈponderately adv
preˈponderˌating adj
preˌponderˈation n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

pre•pon•der•ate

(prɪˈpɒn dəˌreɪt)

v.i. -at•ed, -at•ing.
1. to exceed something else in weight.
2. to incline downward or descend, as one scale or end of a balance, because of greater weight; be weighed down.
3. to be superior in power, force, influence, number, amount, etc.; predominate.
[1615–25; < Latin praeponderātus, past participle of praeponderāre to outweigh. See pre-, ponder, -ate1]
pre•pon`der•a′tion, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

preponderate

- Once meant "weigh more" and "have greater intellectual weight."
See also related terms for weigh.
Farlex Trivia Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

preponderate


Past participle: preponderated
Gerund: preponderating

Imperative
preponderate
preponderate
Present
I preponderate
you preponderate
he/she/it preponderates
we preponderate
you preponderate
they preponderate
Preterite
I preponderated
you preponderated
he/she/it preponderated
we preponderated
you preponderated
they preponderated
Present Continuous
I am preponderating
you are preponderating
he/she/it is preponderating
we are preponderating
you are preponderating
they are preponderating
Present Perfect
I have preponderated
you have preponderated
he/she/it has preponderated
we have preponderated
you have preponderated
they have preponderated
Past Continuous
I was preponderating
you were preponderating
he/she/it was preponderating
we were preponderating
you were preponderating
they were preponderating
Past Perfect
I had preponderated
you had preponderated
he/she/it had preponderated
we had preponderated
you had preponderated
they had preponderated
Future
I will preponderate
you will preponderate
he/she/it will preponderate
we will preponderate
you will preponderate
they will preponderate
Future Perfect
I will have preponderated
you will have preponderated
he/she/it will have preponderated
we will have preponderated
you will have preponderated
they will have preponderated
Future Continuous
I will be preponderating
you will be preponderating
he/she/it will be preponderating
we will be preponderating
you will be preponderating
they will be preponderating
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been preponderating
you have been preponderating
he/she/it has been preponderating
we have been preponderating
you have been preponderating
they have been preponderating
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been preponderating
you will have been preponderating
he/she/it will have been preponderating
we will have been preponderating
you will have been preponderating
they will have been preponderating
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been preponderating
you had been preponderating
he/she/it had been preponderating
we had been preponderating
you had been preponderating
they had been preponderating
Conditional
I would preponderate
you would preponderate
he/she/it would preponderate
we would preponderate
you would preponderate
they would preponderate
Past Conditional
I would have preponderated
you would have preponderated
he/she/it would have preponderated
we would have preponderated
you would have preponderated
they would have preponderated
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.preponderate - weigh more heavily; "these considerations outweigh our wishes"
dominate, predominate, prevail, reign, rule - be larger in number, quantity, power, status or importance; "Money reigns supreme here"; "Hispanics predominate in this neighborhood"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

preponderate

verb
To occupy the preeminent position in:
Idioms: have the ascendancy, reign supreme.
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

preponderate

[prɪˈpɒndəreɪt] VI (frm) → preponderar, predominar
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

preponderate

Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
The lawyer Beamish deplores its "near frenzied emphasis on the letter of the law at the expense of, in fact too frequently in direct defiance of its spirit," with corporate activities "preponderately inspired by such negative considerations as depreciation and depletion allowances, loss carryforwards tax write-offs and similar ..." (525).
Foucault's aesthetic writings are preponderately situated in a rather narrow period of time - basically what he later called "those strange years, the '60s." It was the moment before '68, when the loose group of historians, anthropologists, psychoanalysts, and philosophers that Americans now classify as "poststructuralist" or "postmodernist" was emerging.
In most classrooms, whole-group discussion consists of a mix of conversation and drill with the more experienced (or talented) teachers focusing on the conversational elements whereas the novice teacher may initially confuse conversation and drill, wondering why in such confusion classroom discussions focused on drill just do not seem to "cook." Indeed, the novice's skill development in conducting successful whole-group question-and-answer sequences can be marked by the relative movement from preponderately drill-type questions to conversation.