prepose

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prepose

(priːˈpəʊz)
vb (tr)
(Grammar) to place before
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.prepose - place before another constituent in the sentence; "English preposes the adpositions; Japanese postposes them"
lay, place, put, set, position, pose - put into a certain place or abstract location; "Put your things here"; "Set the tray down"; "Set the dogs on the scent of the missing children"; "Place emphasis on a certain point"
References in periodicals archive ?
3 BSNL Co(Electrical)approved Engine manufacturer with the approved capacity of engine not less than the DG set capacity preposed in the NIT
33: The preposed postpositions are not exceptions; they underwent fronting, a kind of topicalization; cf.
In other words, the preposed constituent performs endophoric reference and temporally locates the postposed subject in the speech event, thus performing a cohesive function (cf.
School librarians can work with others to answer the following questions preposed by Tilke (2011): What is a school library?
the Object or local CA) is consistently less familiar within the discourse than that presented in the preposed segments (e.
Furthermore, the particle va (< conjunction 'or') may express polar interrogation (Kettunen 1943 : 531); it occurs preposed to the predicate in the examples, which tend to have a specific meaning ('as if') rather than being neutral PIs.
In NPs, preposed dependents (numeral + classifier, particle [plural], adnominal quantifiers) and postposed ones (possessors, modifiers, demonstratives, (na)nai 'a moment ago,' anaphor) modify their heads.
The particle amayux here is postposed to a preposed, focused element of the following clause: ting amay(ux), .
According to Greenberg's Universal 14 (1966: 111), the unmarked position is preposed.
It was Tolley's daughter, Bridget, who preposed the idea of an annual gathering of remembrance for missing and murdered Aboriginal women.
However, if correct, the preponderance of suffixation must indicate that postposed elements are more likely to develop into grammatical affixes than preposed.
In the dialectal Egyptian Arabic seventeenth to eighteenth century manuscript which I discussed in Oriente Moderno 2000: 83-97 and published in Le Museon 120, 2007: 395-433 and 121, 2008: 111-141, da/di invariably occurs in preposed position.