prepose

(redirected from preposed)
Also found in: Thesaurus.

prepose

(priːˈpəʊz)
vb (tr)
(Grammar) to place before
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.prepose - place before another constituent in the sentence; "English preposes the adpositions; Japanese postposes them"
lay, place, put, set, position, pose - put into a certain place or abstract location; "Put your things here"; "Set the tray down"; "Set the dogs on the scent of the missing children"; "Place emphasis on a certain point"
References in periodicals archive ?
more than one clause), its syntactic position usually comes after the initial, circumstantial (or subordinate) clause, although there are instances where it is preposed to the head of a sentence for emphasis.
Obviously, this is not the place for an extensive discussion of the multiple factors influencing word order, but I believe that one of the main reasons why participles of the first group are more often used in pre-finite position, is that participles of this type are less complex or, in other words, that the adjectival property they denote is more salient; generalising, it could be said that the preposed participle is focal (in other words, we have constituent focus), while the postposed participle forms part of a broad focus domain together with [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII].
The preposed noun is directly absorbed by the functor, in that it is non-referential, and so lacks a governing determiner.
Furthermore, the particle va (< conjunction 'or') may express polar interrogation (Kettunen 1943 : 531); it occurs preposed to the predicate in the examples, which tend to have a specific meaning ('as if') rather than being neutral PIs.
In NPs, preposed dependents (numeral + classifier, particle [plural], adnominal quantifiers) and postposed ones (possessors, modifiers, demonstratives, (na)nai 'a moment ago,' anaphor) modify their heads.
It was Tolley's daughter, Bridget, who preposed the idea of an annual gathering of remembrance for missing and murdered Aboriginal women.
This means that if there is a topicalized NP or a preposed adverbial, inversion of the subject and finite verb is obligatory in order to keep the latter in second position, as in the German example in (26), the version in (27) being ungrammatical:
In the dialectal Egyptian Arabic seventeenth to eighteenth century manuscript which I discussed in Oriente Moderno 2000: 83-97 and published in Le Museon 120, 2007: 395-433 and 121, 2008: 111-141, da/di invariably occurs in preposed position.
3 /PRNewswire/ -- The Law firms of Vianale & Vianale and Lerach Goughlin Stoia Geller Rudman & Robbins LLP announce a Preposed Settlement Hearing regarding Anchor Glass Container Corporation.
The comment-to-topic progression of "gold" noted in pattern 6 above is reflected syntactically in the interior frame of 5, because in line 2 the "hardest hue," gold, is the preposed object of the infinitive "to hold," whereas the golden "dawn" of line 7 is both subject and agent of "goes down" (I think there is more going on here with "hardest hue to hold," which has a curious feel of middle voice about it, but this apercu, if it is one, must await the laureate's centenary volume).
The study treats rivalry among synonyms in Old English, the reflexive construction, impersonal uses of verbs of motion, verbs with preposed or postposed elements, auxiliary verbs, present and past participles, and loan verbs of motion.
Conversely, a preposed gloss endows the English meaning with an echo effect that enables the reader to focus on the Spanish expression: "[T]he corporal said .