prepositional phrase


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Related to prepositional phrase: Infinitive phrase, prepositions

prepositional phrase

A prepositional phrase is made up of at least a preposition and its object, which can be a noun, pronoun, or a noun phrase. Often times, the object will have a modifier or modifiers (such as adjectives, noun adjuncts, etc.) that appear between it and the preposition. These specify or describe the object, but, unlike prepositions, they do not serve to connect the object grammatically to the rest of the sentence.
Prepositional phrases can behave in two ways in a sentence: as an adjective modifying a noun in the sentence, or as an adverb modifying a verb, adjective, or adverb in the sentence.
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prepositional phrase

n. Abbr. PP
A phrase that consists of a preposition and its object and has adjectival or adverbial value, such as in the house in the people in the house or by him in The book was written by him.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.prepositional phrase - a phrase beginning with a preposition
phrase - an expression consisting of one or more words forming a grammatical constituent of a sentence
Translations
syntagme prépositionnel
References in periodicals archive ?
This clause can in turn be analyzed in terms of groups: On Thursday is a prepositional phrase, he and it are nominal groups and dug is a verbal group.
Finally, as shown in Table 2, the students produced a mean of 15.92 relative clauses during the interactive practice activities, with more occurring after the interlocutors' relative clause questions than after their prepositional phrase questions.
One is tempted to rewrite the first clause thus to make some sense of it: "The night lift flew out from [the] bullhidy blacksack over my own lost hide ..." Doing so reveals an interesting fact: in this order, the opening two noun phrases, the verb, and the prepositional phrase are precisely inverted, forming a mirror image of their order in the sentence as it stands.
Inserting a prepositional phrase as a modifier, on each side of the equation, enlarges meaning:
Later in sequence, pupils may learn if a prepositional phrase is adjective or adverb, depending upon if it modifies a noun or verb.
The aim of this paper is to define the prepositional phrase s 'with' + instrumental as a complement, an adjunct or as a noun postmodifier, and to define which semantic role is assigned to it.
Framing formulaic sequences are typically realized by prepositional phrase structures (9), noun phrases (10), that clause fragments (11), and passive structures (12):
Furthermore, the structural type of postmodifier (that is, choices among clause, prepositional phrase, adjective, and adverbial as postmodifiers) also shows the extent to which complexity/simplicity is present, and how the structural simplification hypothesis is indirectly shown.
I am caught there, in her hanging prepositional phrase, a movement that seems made for or addressed to--what or whom, I won't ever know.
Taking the substantivated prepositional phrase as subject of the main verb in the clause is, as Donini (1999: 203) rightly remarks, advisable, but no emendation seems to be necessary for such purpose: [phrase omitted] may be mentally supplied after [phrase omitted].
This is often easy to overlook when an intervening prepositional phrase confuses the issue.
When, in disgrace with fortune and men's eyes, I all alone beweep my outcast state, And trouble deaf heaven with my bootless cries, And look upon myself, and curse my fate, Wishing me like to one more rich in hope, Featured like him, like him with friends possessed, Desiring this man's art, and that man's scope, With what I most enjoy contented least; (29: 1-8) The prepositional phrase "in disgrace with fortune and men's eyes" in the first line is separated by two commas: one is before it and the other is after it; therefore, it is independent, yet, it is within the framework of the whole "When." clause.