prepossess


Also found in: Thesaurus.

pre·pos·sess

 (prē′pə-zĕs′)
tr.v. pre·pos·sessed, pre·pos·sess·ing, pre·pos·sess·es
1. To preoccupy to the exclusion of other thoughts or feelings: movie stars who prepossess millions of fans.
2.
a. To influence beforehand against or in favor of someone or something; prejudice: "Those to whom she endeavoured to give pleasure were prepossessed in her favour" (Jane Austen).
b. To impress favorably in advance.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

prepossess

(ˌpriːpəˈzɛs)
vb (tr)
1. to preoccupy or engross mentally
2. to influence in advance for or against a person or thing; prejudice; bias
3. to make a favourable impression on beforehand
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

pre•pos•sess

(ˌpri pəˈzɛs)

v.t.
1. to possess or dominate mentally beforehand.
2. to prejudice, esp. favorably.
3. to impress favorably beforehand or at the outset.
[1605–15]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

prepossess


Past participle: prepossessed
Gerund: prepossessing

Imperative
prepossess
prepossess
Present
I prepossess
you prepossess
he/she/it prepossesses
we prepossess
you prepossess
they prepossess
Preterite
I prepossessed
you prepossessed
he/she/it prepossessed
we prepossessed
you prepossessed
they prepossessed
Present Continuous
I am prepossessing
you are prepossessing
he/she/it is prepossessing
we are prepossessing
you are prepossessing
they are prepossessing
Present Perfect
I have prepossessed
you have prepossessed
he/she/it has prepossessed
we have prepossessed
you have prepossessed
they have prepossessed
Past Continuous
I was prepossessing
you were prepossessing
he/she/it was prepossessing
we were prepossessing
you were prepossessing
they were prepossessing
Past Perfect
I had prepossessed
you had prepossessed
he/she/it had prepossessed
we had prepossessed
you had prepossessed
they had prepossessed
Future
I will prepossess
you will prepossess
he/she/it will prepossess
we will prepossess
you will prepossess
they will prepossess
Future Perfect
I will have prepossessed
you will have prepossessed
he/she/it will have prepossessed
we will have prepossessed
you will have prepossessed
they will have prepossessed
Future Continuous
I will be prepossessing
you will be prepossessing
he/she/it will be prepossessing
we will be prepossessing
you will be prepossessing
they will be prepossessing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been prepossessing
you have been prepossessing
he/she/it has been prepossessing
we have been prepossessing
you have been prepossessing
they have been prepossessing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been prepossessing
you will have been prepossessing
he/she/it will have been prepossessing
we will have been prepossessing
you will have been prepossessing
they will have been prepossessing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been prepossessing
you had been prepossessing
he/she/it had been prepossessing
we had been prepossessing
you had been prepossessing
they had been prepossessing
Conditional
I would prepossess
you would prepossess
he/she/it would prepossess
we would prepossess
you would prepossess
they would prepossess
Past Conditional
I would have prepossessed
you would have prepossessed
he/she/it would have prepossessed
we would have prepossessed
you would have prepossessed
they would have prepossessed
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.prepossess - possess beforehand
own, possess, have - have ownership or possession of; "He owns three houses in Florida"; "How many cars does she have?"
2.prepossess - cause to be preoccupied; "The idea of his failure prepossesses him"
preoccupy - engage or engross the interest or attention of beforehand or occupy urgently or obsessively; "His work preoccupies him"; "The matter preoccupies her completely--she cannot think of anything else"
3.prepossess - make a positive impression (on someone) beforehand; "A prepossessing appearance"
impress - impress positively; "The young chess player impressed her audience"
4.prepossess - influence (somebody's) opinion in advance
bias, predetermine - cause to be biased
bias - influence in an unfair way; "you are biasing my choice by telling me yours"
act upon, influence, work - have and exert influence or effect; "The artist's work influenced the young painter"; "She worked on her friends to support the political candidate"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

prepossess

verb
To cause to have a prejudiced view:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

prepossess

[ˌpriːpəˈzes] VT (= preoccupy) → preocupar; (= bias, impress favourably) → predisponer
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

prepossess

vteinnehmen (in sb’s favour für jdn)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in classic literature ?
Krempe was a little squat man with a gruff voice and a repulsive countenance; the teacher, therefore, did not prepossess me in favour of his pursuits.
The approach was not such as to prepossess people--an ill-smelling, dark passage, a staircase half- lighted by bars through which stole a glimmer from a neighboring yard; on the first floor a low door studded with enormous nails, like the principal gate of the Grand Chatelet.
She is perfectly well-bred, indeed, and has the air of a woman of fashion, but her manners are not such as can persuade me of her being prepossessed in my favour.
Next day, to make some return for his entertainment, he took upon him to divert me with some of those stories which the monks amuse simple people with, and told me of a devil that haunted a fountain, and used to make it his employment to plague the monks that came thither to fetch water, and continued his malice till he was converted by the founder of their order, who found him no very stubborn proselyte till they came to the point of circumcision; the devil was unhappily prepossessed with a strong aversion from being circumcised, which, however, by much persuasion, he at last agreed to, and afterwards taking a religious habit, died ten years after with great signs of sanctity.
"I see, sir," said Partridge, falling down upon his knees, "that your honour is prepossessed against me, and resolved not to believe anything I say, and, therefore, what signifies my protestations?
She wanted to ascertain the feelings of each of her visitors; she wanted to compose her own, and to make herself agreeable to all; and in the latter object, where she feared most to fail, she was most sure of success, for those to whom she endeavoured to give pleasure were prepossessed in her favour.
In tallying, health prepossess has a key role to play in healthcare planning decisions--where to locate a new service, whether or not to advance a new national screening program and decisions on best regard highly for money in health and social care provision.[19]