prepotency


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pre·po·ten·cy

 (prē-pōt′n-sē)
n.
1. The condition of being greater in power, influence, or force than another or others; predominance.
2. Genetics The ability of one parent, variety, or strain to transmit individual traits to an offspring, apparently to the exclusion of the other parent, variety, or strain.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

prepotency

(prɪˈpəʊtənsɪ)
n
1. Also: prepotence the state or condition of being prepotent
2. (Genetics) genetics the ability of one parent to transmit more characteristics to its offspring than the other parent
3. (Botany) botany the ability of pollen from one source to bring about fertilization more readily than that from other sources
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

pre•po•ten•cy

(priˈpoʊt n si)

n.
1. preeminence; predominance.
2. the ability of one parent to impress its hereditary characters on its progeny because it possesses more homozygous, dominant, or epistatic genes.
[1855–60; < Latin]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

prepotency

the capacity of one parent to impose its hereditary characteristics on offspring by virtue of its possessing a larger number of homozygous, dominant genes than the other parent. — prepotent, adj.
See also: Heredity
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.prepotency - the state of being predominant over others
ascendance, ascendancy, ascendence, ascendency, dominance, control - the state that exists when one person or group has power over another; "her apparent dominance of her husband was really her attempt to make him pay attention to her"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

prepotency

noun
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
These several remarks are apparently applicable to animals; but the subject is here excessively complicated, partly owing to the existence of secondary sexual characters; but more especially owing to prepotency in transmitting likeness running more strongly in one sex than in the other, both when one species is crossed with another, and when one variety is crossed with another variety.
Ballydoyle, meanwhile, has not enjoyed its prepotency of 2017 -- at this point 12 months ago it had captured five of the Classics run in Britain and Ireland, but the corresponding figure for this season is two.
This is what Maslow meant when he wrote in his groundbreaking 1943 paper, "A Theory of Human Motivation," that basic human needs are organized into a hierarchy of relative prepotency.
Al-Sulta (regime, authority, power) is another challenging keyword: In Salih's text, it is not used to refer to a form of hegemony or sovereignty but a state of naked prepotency shared by the state and the (male) militant.
"Enough of the arrogance, prepotency and intrigue," said President Nicolas Maduro on state television.
Deprivation or frustration of a need of high prepotency causes its control over the body's character.
Furthermore, the genetic perfection of his "new merino stud rams" (592) with their "one hundred per cent prepotency, a lambing rate of a hundred and fifty per cent, early weaning time and the greatest possible uniformity and regularity of build, plus then super-wool qualities" (593) relates to the way in which he wishes to be perceived as a superior and virile ultra-masculine specimen.