prerecession

prerecession

(ˌpriːrɪˈsɛʃən)
adj
(Economics) of the period before a recession
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Meanwhile, prices for many homes haven't returned to prerecession levels, discouraging owners from selling.
By December 2017, unemployment rates had returned to prerecession lows for people of all ages, genders, major race and ethnicity groups, and levels of educational attainment.
Both measures are now at or near their prerecession levels in 2007, a hard-fought recovery.
That, of course, was prerecession. Well, post 2008 microcars and city cars were in demand.
The decline in price growth, if it materializes in 2017, will be a welcome relief for home buyers, as average home values toppled from a prerecession peak in September, according to the (https://us.spindices.com/indices/real-estate/sp-corelogic-case-shiller-us-national-home-price-nsa-index) S&P CoreLogic Case-Shiller U.S.
One area seemingly ripe for efficiency is auto insurance, where reports show that frequency of claims has returned to prerecession levels and severity has reached an all-time high.
Research by Cambrian Park and Leisure Homes has shown consumer confidence for buying major big-ticket purchases such as second homes and lodges has also continued to grow, with current confidence on a par with prerecession levels.
Rural employment, though still below its prerecession levels, grew by 1 percent in the year ending in mid-2015.
At the end of 2015, Pine Bluff payrolls were down 17.5 percent from prerecession levels."
Although workforce has increased re cently, we're still around 100,000 jobs shy of the prerecession peak.
While the percentage of young adults who neither are in school nor working has decreased slightly to 13.8% in 2015, youth disconnection rates remain higher than they were prerecession, 12.9%.