presents


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pres·ent 1

 (prĕz′ənt)
n.
1. A moment or period in time perceptible as intermediate between past and future; now.
2. Grammar
a. The present tense.
b. A verb form in the present tense.
3. presents Law The document or instrument in question: Be it known by these presents.
adj.
1. Existing or happening now; current: the present leader; present trends.
2.
a. Being at hand or in attendance: Thirty guests were present at the ceremony.
b. Existing in something specified: Oxygen is present in the bloodstream.
3. Now being considered; actually here or involved: the present subject; present company excepted.
4. Grammar Designating a verb tense or form that expresses current time.
5. Archaic Readily available; immediate.
6. Obsolete Alert to circumstances; attentive.
Idioms:
at present
At the present time; right now.
for the present
For the time being; temporarily.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin praesēns, praesent-, present participle of praeesse, to be present : prae-, pre- + esse, to be; see es- in Indo-European roots.]

pres′ent·ness n.

pre·sent 2

 (prĭ-zĕnt′)
v. pre·sent·ed, pre·sent·ing, pre·sents
v.tr.
1.
a. To make a gift or award of: presented the medal to the winner.
b. To make a gift to: presented the winner with a medal.
2.
a. To offer for observation, examination, or consideration; show or display: The detective presented his badge.
b. To offer (a play, for example) for public entertainment.
c. To afford or furnish: The situation presented us with a chance to improve our knowledge.
d. To turn or position in the direction of another: presented his face to the camera.
e. Immunology To display (an antigen) on the cell surface. Used especially of cells such as macrophages and dendritic cells, where the displayed antigen activates T cells as part of an immune response.
3. To represent or depict in a certain manner: The movie presents bankers as greedy and coldhearted.
4.
a. To introduce, especially with formal ceremony.
b. To introduce (a young woman) to society with conventional ceremony.
5. To hold, carry, or point (a weapon) in a particular manner as a salutation or sign of honor, usually along the center axis of the body.
6. Ecclesiastical To recommend (a cleric) for a benefice.
v.intr.
1. To make a presentation.
2. Medicine
a. To be evident or manifest. Used of a disease or condition: how Lyme disease presents in its later stages.
b. To exhibit symptoms or signs during a medical examination: The patient presented with headache and heel pain.
n.
1. pres·ent (prĕz′ənt) Something presented; a gift.
2. pre·sent (prĭ-zĕnt′) The position of a rifle or other weapon when presented.

[Middle English presenten, from Old French presenter, from Latin presentāre, to show, from praesēns, praesent-, present participle of praeesse, to be in front of; see present1.]

pre·sent′er n.

presents

(ˈprɛzənts)
pl n
(Law) law used in a deed or document to refer to itself: know all men by these presents.
References in classic literature ?
Other things being equal, the value of a book, and especially of an author's whole work, is proportional to its range, that is to the breadth and variety of the life and characters which it presents.
Dell," said he, "let's put our Christmas presents away and keep 'em a while.
Of things themselves some are predicable of a subject, and are never present in a subject.
The response of an organism to a given stimulus is very often dependent upon the past history of the organism, and not merely upon the stimulus and the HITHERTO DISCOVERABLE present state of the organism.
The now temperate regions of the United States would likewise be covered by arctic plants and animals, and these would be nearly the same with those of Europe; for the present circumpolar inhabitants, which we suppose to have everywhere travelled southward, are remarkably uniform round the world.
The jolliest person present, as well as the most important, was of course old Santa Claus; so he was given the seat of honor at one end of the table while at the other end sat Princess Ozma, the hostess.
Having already described him in most of his present habitatory and anatomical peculiarities, it now remains to magnify him in an archaeological, fossiliferous, and antediluvian point of view.
Having carefully considered the subject of the above discourses, and wondering within myself whether the present times were propitious to a new prince, and whether there were elements that would give an opportunity to a wise and virtuous one to introduce a new order of things which would do honour to him and good to the people of this country, it appears to me that so many things concur to favour a new prince that I never knew a time more fit than the present.
Why, the new Government Bakery was opened only last week, and I gave orders to sell the bread at cost-price during the present scarcity
Once or twice indeed, since James's engagement had taught her what could be done, she had got so far as to indulge in a secret "perhaps," but in general the felicity of being with him for the present bounded her views: the present was now comprised in another three weeks, and her happiness being certain for that period, the rest of her life was at such a distance as to excite but little interest.
This doctrine, I am afraid, is at present carried much too far: for why should writing differ so much from all other arts?
Immediately we were teazed by those who brought us the mules, and demanded to be paid the hire of them; and had advice given us at the same time that we should get a present ready for the King.