press agent

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press agent

n.
A person employed to arrange advertising and publicity, as for a performer or business.

press agentry n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

press agent

n
(Journalism & Publishing) a person employed to obtain favourable publicity, such as notices in newspapers, for an organization, actor, etc. Abbreviation: PA
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

press′ a′gent


n.
a person employed to promote an individual or organization by obtaining favorable publicity.
press′-a`gent•ry, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.press agent - someone employed to arrange publicity (for a firm or a public figure)press agent - someone employed to arrange publicity (for a firm or a public figure)
publiciser, publicist, publicizer - someone who publicizes
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
addetto stampaagente pubblicitario

press agent

npress agent m/f
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
Bernays said: "Some people just use public relations as a euphemism for press agentry. A firm sends articles or press releases to newspapers to win favour for the client and it usually ends up in the trash.
Grunig(1983) proposed public relation models, one of the PR models, Press Agentry or Publicity model indicates one way communication, where sender only transmits messages for receivers.
The existing conditions of PR field in Pakistan are analyzed in this qualitative study by investigating the consumption of four PR models (press agentry, public information, two-way asymmetrical and two-way symmetrical) proposed by Grunig and Hunt (1984).
The Press Agentry Model (Model 1) and The Public Information Model (Model 2), relate to oneway communication from organisations to their publics and do not involve research for the development of messages (Mahoney, 2008).
This study was guided by the excellence theory first proposed by Grunig and Hunt (1984) with the four models of public relations: press agentry, public information, two-way asymmetric, and two-way symmetric, or excellence communications.
To start with, from the four models conceptualized by Grunig and Hunt in 1984 (press agentry, public information, two-way asymmetrical, and two-way symmetrical), practitioners should adopt the two way models and, preferably, the symmetrical one.
On the other hand, consider the present state of press agentry. Flacks--that's what Variety calls them-once were a colorful fraternity devoted to promoting the fortunes of their famous clients.
Grunig's (1984) original four public relations models including press agentry model, public information model, two-way asymmetrical model, and two-way symmetrical model, were used in these three countries.
She calls herself Jerry Berger's "younger, hipper, taller, cuter, little sister." It's a good line, combining the best of reporting and press agentry.
(39) Notably, the guidelines did not focus on practitioners' professional practices but merely upon techniques for media relations, if not press agentry.
Not to be swayed by press agentry, traditional thinking, or a personal bias they weren't even conscious of.
The engineered communication sponsored cynicism among those with no ability to unravel truth; it was the inevitable outcome, it would seem, to communication moving from flim-flammery and press agentry to cleverly bundled messages.