pressured


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Related to pressured: Pressured speech

pres·sure

 (prĕsh′ər)
n.
1.
a. The act of pressing.
b. The condition of being pressed.
2. The application of continuous force by one body on another that it is touching; compression.
3. Abbr. P Physics Force applied uniformly over a surface, measured as force per unit area.
4. Meteorology Atmospheric pressure.
5.
a. A compelling or constraining influence, such as persuasion or negative attitudes, on the mind or will: felt pressure to conform; peer-group pressure.
b. An influence acting as a source of distress or hardship: economic pressures forcing people to work two jobs.
c. Sports Sustained, effective play that puts an opponent at a disadvantage: Defensive pressure forced the quarterback to throw interceptions.
d. The condition of being subjected to physical, mental, social, or economic distress: doesn't work well under pressure.
6. A physical sensation produced by compression of a part of the body.
7. Archaic A mark made by application of force or weight; an impression.
tr.v. pres·sured, pres·sur·ing, pres·sures
1. To force or try to force, as by influence or persuasion: The salesman pressured us to buy the car right away.
2. To pressurize.
3. To pressure-cook.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin pressūra, from pressus, past participle of premere, to press; see per- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

pressured

(ˈprɛʃəd)
adj
(of a person) subject to pressure and stress
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Translations

pressured

[ˈprɛʃərd] adjtendu(e)pressure gauge nmanomètre mpressure group ngroupe m de pressionpressure point npoint m de compressionpressure sore nescarre f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The supporting gas canisters, gauges, dials and airlocks make the chambers look as though they are supporting an extraterrestrial system; indeed, much of the research in the 1960s was aimed at determining ways to limit damage to divers coming up from deep water and spacewalkers leaving their pressured capsules.
As they were about to present their calculations to the American Physical Society meeting, they received news from a French group that is performing actual experiments with pressured silicon.