prestidigitation


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Related to prestidigitation: legerdemain

pres·ti·dig·i·ta·tion

 (prĕs′tĭ-dĭj′ĭ-tā′shən)
n.
1. Performance of or skill in performing magic or conjuring tricks with the hands; sleight of hand.
2. Skill or cleverness, especially in deceiving others.

[French (influenced by prestigiateur, juggler, conjurer, from prestige, illusion), from prestidigitateur, conjurer : preste, nimble (from Italian presto; see presto) + Latin digitus, finger; see digit.]

pres′ti·dig′i·ta′tor n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

prestidigitation

(ˌprɛstɪˌdɪdʒɪˈteɪʃən)
n
another name for sleight of hand
[C19: from French: quick-fingeredness, from Latin praestigiae feats of juggling, tricks, probably influenced by French preste nimble, and Latin digitus finger; see prestige]
ˌprestiˈdigiˌtator n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

pres•ti•dig•i•ta•tion

(ˌprɛs tɪˌdɪdʒ ɪˈteɪ ʃən)

n.
sleight of hand; legerdemain.
[1855–60; < French, = preste nimble (< Italian; see presto) + Latin digit(us) finger + French -ation -ation]
pres`ti•dig′i•ta`tor, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

prestidigitation

the art of legerdemain; sleight of hand. — prestidigitator, n.prestidigitatorial, prestidigitatory, adj.
See also: Performing
the art of legerdemain; sleight of hand. — prestidigitator, n. — prestidigitatorial, prestidigitatory, adj.
See also: Magic
the performance of tricks and illusions by the quick and skillful use of the hands; conjuring; sleight of hand. Also called prestigiation. — prestidigitator, n.prestidigitatorial, prestidigitatory, adj.
See also: Hands
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.prestidigitation - manual dexterity in the execution of tricks
conjuring trick, legerdemain, magic trick, thaumaturgy, magic, deception, conjuration, illusion, trick - an illusory feat; considered magical by naive observers
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

prestidigitation

noun
The use of skillful tricks and deceptions to produce entertainingly baffling effects:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

prestidigitation

[ˈprestɪˌdɪdʒɪˈteɪʃən] Nprestidigitación f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

prestidigitation

n (form)Fingerfertigkeit f, → Geschicklichkeit f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
Carlosbach was troubled by the deception he saw all around him, as well as by the fraudulent use of the art and science of prestidigitation.
During our meetings, he did some impressive spoon-bending and other prestidigitation, unmasking the tricks with which Li Hongzhi has induced the credulous to part with their money.
A little mathematical prestidigitation by the staff, and we figured Jones has written about a million and a half words for the paper.
Wills declares that to view "keep" to mean "possess personally at home" is "a lot to load into one word."(30) He then proceeds to pile a load upon the term that exceeds even his powers of linguistic prestidigitation. Wills carefully chooses citations from English libertarians and the Articles of Confederation ("debris" when employed by Standard Modelers) that mention the ability or right of established governments to "keep up" a standing army, a militia, or an armory and then assumes this to be the meaning intended by the Founders.
The childhood-orienting devices for which Olesha's art is most celebrated, however, are the cultivation of idiosyncratic narrative perspectives (heights, mirrors, portals, shadows, distorting reflectors and lenses) and, most important of all, of verbal prestidigitation involving whimsical comparisons and 'resemblances'.
Eckes's scholarship on this point is, in short, impressive chiefly as a feat of prestidigitation.
Rutherford's (and the reader's) implosive experience is reflected, redeemed, and re-doubled by Johnson's textual prestidigitation. The novel leaves its provenance uncertain: Is it the diary Rutherford started keeping after Falcon's death?
Croce's feat of prestidigitation is the assurance that if you can get the right answer to the second question, the first will solve itself and the power threat posed by "the mass" disappear.
marvels of prestidigitation with playing cards, a subtle program
At the time I met him, Locos, a beautifully self-contained novel, an act of prestidigitation, was already published.
Some prestidigitation is needed to make the Hermetic framework fit.
Prestidigitation always figures in the best guest rooms; a little sleight of hand turns the space quickly into something useful when you don't have overnight visitors.