prestige

(redirected from prestiges)
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pres·tige

 (prĕ-stēzh′, -stēj′)
n.
1. The level of respect at which a person or thing is regarded by others; standing: an act that boosted his prestige; a job with low prestige.
2. Good reputation; honor: Her accomplishments lent a lot of prestige to the college.
3. Great respect or importance: Doctors are usually treated with prestige.

[French, illusion, magic trick, charm, ability to inspire admiration, prestige, from Latin praestīgiae, tricks, probably alteration of *praestrīgiae, from praestringere, to touch, blunt, blind : prae-, pre- + stringere, to draw tight; see streig- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

prestige

(prɛˈstiːʒ)
n
1. high status or reputation achieved through success, influence, wealth, etc; renown
2.
a. the power to influence or impress; glamour
b. (modifier): a prestige car.
[C17: via French from Latin praestigiae feats of juggling, tricks; apparently related to Latin praestringere to bind tightly, blindfold, from prae before + stringere to draw tight, bind]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

pres•tige

(prɛˈstiʒ, -ˈstidʒ)

n.
1. reputation or influence arising from success, achievement, rank, or other favorable attributes.
2. distinction or reputation attaching to a person or thing and thus possessing a cachet for others.
adj.
3. having or showing success, rank, wealth, etc.: a prestige car.
[1820–30; < French (orig. pl.): deceits, juggler's tricks < Latin praestīgiae juggler's tricks]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.prestige - a high standing achieved through success or influence or wealth etc.prestige - a high standing achieved through success or influence or wealth etc.; "he wanted to achieve power and prestige"
standing - social or financial or professional status or reputation; "of equal standing"; "a member in good standing"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

prestige

Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

prestige

noun
1. The level of credit or respect at which one is regarded by others:
2. A person's high standing among others:
3. A position of exalted widely recognized importance:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
هَيْبَةٌهَيْبَه، إحْتِرام
prestiž
prestigeanseelse
arvovalta
prestiž
orîstír, álit
名声
명성
prestižas
prestižs
prestíž
ugled
prestige
ความเคารพนบนอบที่เป็นผลมาจากความสำเร็จ
itibarprestijsaygınlık
uy tín

prestige

[presˈtiːʒ] Nprestigio m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

prestige

[prɛˈstiːʒ]
nprestige m
modif [job] → de prestige; [car, item] → de prestige
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

prestige

nPrestige nt; prestige valuePrestigewert m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

prestige

[prɛsˈtiːʒ] nprestigio
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

prestige

(preˈstiːʒ) noun
reputation or influence due to success, rank etc.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

prestige

هَيْبَةٌ prestiž prestige Prestige γόητρο prestigio arvovalta prestige prestiž prestigio 名声 명성 prestige prestisje prestiż prestígio престиж prestige ความเคารพนบนอบที่เป็นผลมาจากความสำเร็จ prestij uy tín 声望
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009
References in classic literature ?
Strickland, and at the same time gave her not a little prestige. This was not without its use in the calling which she had decided to follow.
"He's relying on the prestige he'll get out of this idol of gold if his party finds it," thought on the young inventor.
It was not a love of the grandiose or the prestige attached to the command of great tonnage, for he continued, with an air of disgust and contempt, "Why, you get flung out of your bunk as likely as not in any sort of heavy weather."
Leisurely and with something of an air I strolled along with my heart expanding at the thought that I was a citizen of great Gotham, a sharer in its magnificence and pleasures, a partaker in its glory and prestige.
The extreme, almost ascetic purity of his thought, combined with an astounding ignorance of worldly conditions, had set before him a goal of power and prestige to be attained without the medium of arts, graces, tact, wealth - by sheer weight of merit alone.
How could one have expected her to throw off the unholy prestige of that long domination?
Battle after battle, Magersfontein, Colenso, Spion Kop, lost on the playing fields of Eton, had humiliated the nation and dealt the death-blow to the prestige of the aristocracy and gentry who till then had found no one seriously to oppose their assertion that they possessed a natural instinct of government.