presumptuousness


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Related to presumptuousness: plausible

pre·sump·tu·ous

 (prĭ-zŭmp′cho͞o-əs)
adj.
Going beyond what is right or proper; excessively forward: felt it was presumptuous of him to assume they had become friends.

[Middle English, from Old French presumptueux, from Late Latin praesūmptuōsus, variant of praesūmptiōsus, from praesūmptiō, presumption; see presumption.]

pre·sump′tu·ous·ly adv.
pre·sump′tu·ous·ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.presumptuousness - audacious (even arrogant) behavior that you have no right to; "he despised them for their presumptuousness"
audaciousness, audacity - aggressive boldness or unmitigated effrontery; "he had the audacity to question my decision"
uppishness, uppityness - assumption of airs beyond one's station

presumptuousness

noun
Translations
تَجاسُر، وَقاحَه، قِلَّة حَياء
drzost
indbildskhed
önhittség
ósvífni
haddini bilmezlikküstahlık

presumptuousness

[prɪˈzʌmptjʊəsnɪs] N (= arrogance) → presunción f; (= liberty-taking) → atrevimiento m

presumptuousness

n (of person, remark)Unverschämtheit f, → Dreistigkeit f; (in connection with one’s abilities) → Überheblichkeit f, → Anmaßung f, → Vermessenheit f (geh); (of behaviour)Unverschämtheit f

presume

(prəˈzjuːm) verb
1. to believe that something is true without proof; to take for granted. When I found the room empty, I presumed that you had gone home; `Has he gone?' `I presume so.'
2. to be bold enough (to act without the right, knowledge etc to do so). I wouldn't presume to advise someone as clever as you.
preˈsumably adverb
I presume. She's not in her office – presumably she went home early.
preˈsumption (-ˈzamp-) noun
1. something presumed. She married again, on the presumption that her first husband was dead.
2. unsuitable boldness, eg in one's behaviour towards another person.
preˈsumptuous (-ˈzamptjuəs) , ((American) -ˈzamptʃuəs) adjective
impolitely bold.
preˈsumptuousness noun
References in classic literature ?
Thus doth the master give free scope to his slaves, and even enjoyeth their presumptuousness.
Because of pride and presumptuousness one can end up locked out of that narrow gate, which demands humility and self-divestment of airs incongruous in God's banquet.
There can be no question that this is a time to speak against this evil presumptuousness in our midst.
In fact, despite Jared Kushner's patronizing presumptuousness, nothing in his vision was new, since Palestinians had already imagined such a future.
In fact, despite Jared Kushner's patronising presumptuousness, nothing in his vision was new, since Palestinians had already imagined such a future.
To refuse to do so is, in Greek, hubris (presumptuousness, arrogance, insolence, aggressive pride, wantonness, outrage)--die pretense that the measure is reducible to oneself.
This costly penchant for opulence among Pastors, or leaders of different churches - which strikes one as though the purpose for which Christianity has become a widely-accepted religion is being turned upside down and sacrificed on the altar of fanfaronade and presumptuousness - indicates a very disturbing trend that must be nipped in the bud before it transmogrifies into a noxious epidemic, lest the entire Christian world and our dear nation be consumed by it.
How vulgar it is, nature's presumptuousness, grabbing at this and that.
His sophomore novel, Our Lady of Alice Bhatti, was a tad more muted and daring; but using the perspective of a poor Christian woman (Christians are a beleaguered low-caste minority in Pakistan) gave Hanif's brand of tragicomedy a whiff of presumptuousness. Even still, Hanif's reputation for cheek continues to sustain the fevered anticipation of this new novel.
This totally untenable argument was of a piece with the regime's presumptuousness; it has been allowed to get away with equating its political calculations and cunning with the nation's sovereign interests.
The presumptuousness in delegating a program which requires the prerequisite of owning a smart phone, is also a testament of the increasingly evident detachment of the higher echelons of government bodies from the common man, where it cannot relate to the financial realities of the latter.
The Renaissance Christian humanist and theologian Nicholas of Cusa (1401-64) called this self-centered arrogance "unlearned ignorance," the ignorance of those who trust in their human intelligence and who, through pride and presumptuousness, close themselves off to the path of divine wisdom.