presuppose

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pre·sup·pose

 (prē′sə-pōz′)
tr.v. pre·sup·posed, pre·sup·pos·ing, pre·sup·pos·es
1. To believe or suppose in advance: "In passing moral judgments ... we presuppose that a man's actions, and hence also his being a good or a bad man, are in his power" (Leo Strauss).
2. To require or involve necessarily as an antecedent condition: "The term tax relief ... presupposes a conceptual metaphor: Taxes are an affliction" (George Lakoff).

pre·sup′po·si′tion (prē-sŭp′ə-zĭsh′ən) n.
pre·sup′po·si′tion·al adj.

presuppose

(ˌpriːsəˈpəʊz)
vb (tr)
1. to take for granted; assume
2. to require or imply as a necessary prior condition
3. (Philosophy) philosophy logic linguistics to require (a condition) to be satisfied as a precondition for a statement to be either true or false or for a speech act to be felicitous. Have you stopped beating your wife? presupposes that the person addressed has a wife and has beaten her
presupposition n

pre•sup•pose

(ˌpri səˈpoʊz)

v.t. -posed, -pos•ing.
1. to suppose or assume beforehand; take for granted in advance.
2. to require or imply as an antecedent condition: An effect presupposes a cause.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Middle French]
pre`sup•po•si′tion (-sʌp əˈzɪʃ ən) n.

presuppose


Past participle: presupposed
Gerund: presupposing

Imperative
presuppose
presuppose
Present
I presuppose
you presuppose
he/she/it presupposes
we presuppose
you presuppose
they presuppose
Preterite
I presupposed
you presupposed
he/she/it presupposed
we presupposed
you presupposed
they presupposed
Present Continuous
I am presupposing
you are presupposing
he/she/it is presupposing
we are presupposing
you are presupposing
they are presupposing
Present Perfect
I have presupposed
you have presupposed
he/she/it has presupposed
we have presupposed
you have presupposed
they have presupposed
Past Continuous
I was presupposing
you were presupposing
he/she/it was presupposing
we were presupposing
you were presupposing
they were presupposing
Past Perfect
I had presupposed
you had presupposed
he/she/it had presupposed
we had presupposed
you had presupposed
they had presupposed
Future
I will presuppose
you will presuppose
he/she/it will presuppose
we will presuppose
you will presuppose
they will presuppose
Future Perfect
I will have presupposed
you will have presupposed
he/she/it will have presupposed
we will have presupposed
you will have presupposed
they will have presupposed
Future Continuous
I will be presupposing
you will be presupposing
he/she/it will be presupposing
we will be presupposing
you will be presupposing
they will be presupposing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been presupposing
you have been presupposing
he/she/it has been presupposing
we have been presupposing
you have been presupposing
they have been presupposing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been presupposing
you will have been presupposing
he/she/it will have been presupposing
we will have been presupposing
you will have been presupposing
they will have been presupposing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been presupposing
you had been presupposing
he/she/it had been presupposing
we had been presupposing
you had been presupposing
they had been presupposing
Conditional
I would presuppose
you would presuppose
he/she/it would presuppose
we would presuppose
you would presuppose
they would presuppose
Past Conditional
I would have presupposed
you would have presupposed
he/she/it would have presupposed
we would have presupposed
you would have presupposed
they would have presupposed
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.presuppose - take for granted or as a given; suppose beforehand; "I presuppose that you have done your work"
assume, presume, take for granted - take to be the case or to be true; accept without verification or proof; "I assume his train was late"
postulate, posit - take as a given; assume as a postulate or axiom; "He posited three basic laws of nature"
premiss, premise - take something as preexisting and given
2.presuppose - require as a necessary antecedent or precondition; "This step presupposes two prior ones"
logic - the branch of philosophy that analyzes inference
imply - suggest as a logically necessary consequence; in logic

presuppose

verb presume, consider, accept, suppose, assume, take it, imply, take for granted, postulate, posit, take as read All your arguments presuppose that he is a rational man.

presuppose

verb
To take for granted without proof:
Informal: reckon.
Translations

presuppose

[ˌpriːsəˈpəʊz] VTpresuponer

presuppose

[ˌpriːsəˈpəʊz] vtprésupposer

presuppose

vtvoraussetzen; (= require also)zur Voraussetzung haben

presuppose

[ˌpriːsəˈpəʊz] vtpresupporre
References in periodicals archive ?
In fact, it is not so difficult to envisage ways of doing so; for instance one might design the theory so that it ends up delivering conditionalized ascriptions of truth conditions and what is said such as (7) and (8)--thereby granting something to presuppositional views, while also making glaringly obvious why reductive ambitions are out of place (see also Borg 2004, ch.
Abbreviations ABS absolutive ADVLZR adverbializer APP applicative ART article BLC Basic Locative Construction BLF Basic Locative Function CONJ conjunction COP copula DET determiner DETR detransitive DIM diminutive EMPH emphatic EQU equative F feminine FOC focus HAB habitual INESS inessive LOC locative MED medial N neuter NEG negative NF nonfuture NMZR nominalizer ORIENT orientativePERF PERF perfect PL plural PN pronoun PP postposition PRES present PROG progressive PRSUP presuppositional marker PSPV Picture Series for Positional Verbs (Ameka et al.
Stories have their effect, after all, because human beings can understand each other across presuppositional lines.
He takes a step toward this in the final chapter by providing a helpful outline of the various views or approaches: the classical, establishing the existence of God by means of natural theology and then demonstrating Christianity's validity as the highest version of theism; the evidential, relying on external evidences, particularly the miracles of Jesus and his resurrection; the cumulative case method, assembling all the arguments for the Christian claim; a presuppositional apologetics, a particularly Protestant approach that proceeds from an assumption of the Bible's truth; and a Reformed epistemological approach that relies on the testimonium Sancti Spiritus internurn to enable one to accept Christian belief without the necessity of prior demonstrations.
Let's discuss strategies that I used with you included scaling questions, exception-finding questions, and presuppositional questions.
What gives the Christian Right its distinctive character is its combination of a specific political theology reflected in the writings of Rousas John Rushdoony, a theology of culture developed and articulated by Francis Schaeffer, and a presuppositional strategy that is unique to Dutch Calvinism.
1969 "A presuppositional analysis of onIy and even", in: Robert I.
Coe contributed both conceptually and procedurally to missiology in the formulation of contextualization, offering a model that moved significantly beyond indigenization, which often simply placed indigenous individuals into the institutional and presuppositional forms of an alien Western culture.
Those who are reasonably satisfied tend toward the presuppositional sense of norms, whereas less satisfied philosophers tend toward the corrective one.
(82) But because, as Levinson is quite correct in pointing out, "constancy under negation is not in fact a rich enough definition to pick out a coherent, homogenous set of inferences," (83) the tests for presuppositional defeasibility (the notion that presuppositions are liable to evaporate in certain contexts) and the projection problem of presuppositions (i.e.
The most prototypical core, located within the domain of presuppositional terms (according to Traugott, 1990:505, "terms that presuppose, entail or implicate relations to a scale and that, at least in some of their meanings, express speaker attitudes") is supplemented with another important core, located within the domain of exclusive or focusing adverbs (Nevalainen, 1991).
JULIE HUNTER, "Presuppositional Indexicals." Advisers: David I.