pretelevision

pretelevision

(ˌpriːtɛlɪˈvɪʒən)
adj
1. (Broadcasting) occurring before the arrival of television
2. (Historical Terms) occurring before the arrival of television
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Major League Baseball is a pretelevision and therefore premodern sport that continues to have a problematic relationship or, more accurately, a dysfunctional marriage with television-the indispensable life force of big-time corporate sport.
But what are we to make of the fact that Truman also failed to communicate his leaderly qualities to the satisfaction of majorities during most of his pretelevision presidency?
Hundreds of radio stations in Michigan have now gone from the variety of programming of the pretelevision days to specialized programming, usually concentrating on a particular style of music.
The influence of television on pretelevision media institutions is undeniable, and that influence extended to the entertainment and leisure-time businesses increasingly supported by mass media, including baseball.
However, it had an advantage, in those pretelevision days, of seeing the conductor's face and gestures.
``It is less of an attraction to go and see her in greater numbers than in the pretelevision days.''
In this pretelevision era, the term "soundbite" had yet to be coined, but Johnson was a master of it nonetheless.
Old, rumpled, overweight, gruffvoiced, pretelevision, pre-New Democrat Tip O'Neill?
It was a sensational story even in the pretelevision era.
Gloria remembers: "It was in pretelevision Northern Ireland, shock horror that long ago, and home-spun entertainment was huge.
Large numbers of people in this pretelevision era turned to reading.