pretendership

pretendership

(prɪˈtɛndərʃɪp)
n
the standing of a pretender
References in periodicals archive ?
Bakhtin demonstrates that these kinds of attitudes of pretendership are derived from so-called "theoretism," which is responsible for the subjective or solipsistic projection toward the others.
The protagonist's silence is a part of his Bakhtinian pretendership, or in other words, it comes from lack of proactive and interpersonal communications.
Marlow may try to provoke or invite Jim to reveal and outgrow himself by using his relationship to the other, though Jim remains silent and ambiguous in his pretendership despite the impossibility of the task.
Jim's pretendership with romantic heroism or ideal imperialism holds such loopholes as "an everlasting deep hole," "infernal hole," or "a deadly hole.
Jim's desire in his pretendership is geared more toward what he is to create in his socio-cultural relationship with others rather than simply counterbalancing or satiating what is missing and lacking in his existential excursion into Patusan.
Onegin the Play contained none of the potentially troubling political subtexts of tyranny, treason, Catholic Poland, or pretendership that the historical drama Boris had in such abundance.
Not only is it periodically swallowed in the mist and buffeted by a wind that howls, we are told, like Solovei-Razboinik (in Russian folk legend, an evil spirit that ensnares its victims by whistling), but it is reputed to have been erected by Peter the Great, a Tsar associated in Russian folk custom with pretendership and demonic usurpation of power.
In this respect, their pretendership may have been modeled on that of the First False Dmitrii, and it is perhaps not surprising that they made use of the royal mark motif which had been attributed to him.
61) Part of Bogomolov's punishment for his pretendership (similar to Kremnev's) was to be branded with "shameful marks" on his face.
Variants of the song about Grisha Otrep'ev with the motif of the cross that he grew on his chest continued to be recorded well into the 20th century, (82) but cases of pretendership ceased after the 1860s, probably reflecting the relatively straightforward series of successions to the throne by primogeniture after 1855.
Nasibulin's work illustrating Boris Godunov as a Comedy poses interesting questions about the art of pretendership.