prevalency

prevalency

(ˈprɛvələnsɪ)
n
an obsolete word for prevalence
References in classic literature ?
Hence it is that history furnishes us with so many mortifying examples of the prevalency of foreign corruption in republican governments.
It is crucial to understand that under the metatheory an individual's misidentification in this way or adjustment otherwise to it is quintessential mental disorder irrespective of prevalency in the population or adamancy with which the misidentification is held by the person (Azibo, 2014a).
Owing to the rising prevalency of antibiotic-resistant pathogens in hospitals and at homes, a deliberate search is in progress for alternative treatments in order to more effectively fight against further spread of antibiotic-resistant pathogens (Baravalia et al., 2009).
There will be no settled rule of conduct, but everything will fluctuate with the alternate prevalency of contending factions.
81, "competent to the determination of matters of national jurisdiction." (1) The Framers were unwilling to rely on the state courts for this purpose, as the Antifederalists preferred, largely because "the prevalency of a local spirit may be found to disqualify the local tribunals for the jurisdiction of national causes." (2) Indeed, the Framers were so apprehensive of state court bias, or the perception of bias, in favor of local interests that they considered a neutral federal tribunal necessary in some cases for the peace and harmony of the union.
A practical need also existed for these local institutions to enforce federal rights because "[t]he reasonableness of the agency of the national courts in cases in which the State tribunals cannot be supposed to be impartial speaks for itself." (85) Moreover, "the most discerning cannot foresee how far the prevalency of a local spirit may be found to disqualify the local tribunals for the jurisdiction of national causes." (86) Hamilton also observed that "State judges, holding their offices during pleasure, or from year to year, will be too little independent to be relied upon for an inflexible execution of the national laws." (87)
Alexander Hamilton, expressing his fear that state judges might be biased against federal claims in state court, opined that "the prevalency of a local spirit may be found to disqualify the local tribunals for the jurisdiction of national causes" (251) An Article III judge, like a state judge, "belongs to" the geographic state (or circuit) in which he or she sits.
The increase begins in Eastern Asia with the highest prevalency in Melanesia with 33%, but it has been obeserved that its frequency in other part of the world is very low (lower and/or equal to 1%).
81 (Alexander Hamilton), reprinted in II THE DEBATE ON THE CONSTITUTION, at 487-88 ("The most discerning cannot foresee how far the prevalency of a local spirit may be found to disqualify the local tribunals for the jurisdiction of national causes....").