previable


Also found in: Medical.

previable

(priːˈvaɪəbəl)
adj
(Gynaecology & Obstetrics) occurring before a fetus has developed enough to survive outside the uterus
References in periodicals archive ?
In the Illinois Senate, he repeatedly voted against protection for abortion survivors because, as he explained in 2001 on the Senate floor, he thought protecting the rights of "previable" newborn babies logically undermined the right to kill those babies while still in utero.
Exclusion criteria included those enrolled in Centering Pregnancy[R], previable deliveries (less than 23 weeks), transfer into PodCare or initiation to prenatal care after 20-week gestation, and transfer to maternal-fetal medicine during prenatal care.
If the foetus is previable (<24 weeks of gestation) surgical removal of the tumor during pregnancy and if the pregnancy is advanced medical management until foetal lung maturity is documented in the literature.
Surgical management in a previable pregnancy is largely managed by interrupting the aberrant vasculature of the pump twin towards the acardiac twin and designed to arrest the reverse flow from the pump twin to the acardiac twin, improving the prognosis of the pump twin.
At autopsy, a slightly growth-restricted previable, immature female fetus with grade 1-2 maceration and moderate-to-marked hydrops was examined.
En los ultimos anos, cada vez mas investigaciones han mencionado que las amnioinfusiones repetidas pueden prolongar la gestacion y mejorar los resultados perinatales en los casos de RPM previable (2).
Bamforth, "Amnion rupture sequence in previable fetuses," American Journal of Medical Genetics, vol.
The presence of preeclampsia is responsible for a high percentage of iatrogenic preterm births, because the cure for the disorder is delivery--even at early or previable gestational age.
Kennedy could simultaneously adhere to his position that stare decisis requires preserving the right to elective abortion, and write or join a "reasoned judgment" explaining why the State's interest in protecting the previable fetus outweighs the woman's interest in an elective abortion.
McCullough & Frank A Chervenak, Ethics in Obstetrics and Gynecology 105 (1994) ("There is no compelling reason in bioethics, as a philosophical intellectual undertaking, for the physician, the pregnant woman, or anyone else--the male gamete donor, family members, or the state, in particular--to regard the previable fetus as independently possessing, lacking, or possessing only to some degree, the moral status of being a patient.").