priest-hole


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priest-hole

or

priest's hole

n
(Historical Terms) a secret chamber in certain houses in England, built as a hiding place for Roman Catholic priests when they were proscribed in the 16th and 17th centuries
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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References in periodicals archive ?
The property has a fascinating history - John Wesley is said to have preached there and there is reputed to be a "priest-hole" concealed in the original walls.
I'm nothing like Samantha, the social-climbing, has-been actress who hates the noise of cows mooing, complains about the mud and sticks a power-shower in the priest-hole of her historic manor house.
The three-storey house has a reception room which Rodney has now turned into an office, with a priest-hole room and trap-door hidden under the carpet.
Is Goosie, Goosie Gander about the Reformation and a Catholic priest (gander) persecuted after being found hiding in a 'priest-hole' in a lady's chamber?
Charles was hustled away into the safety of the priest-hole as the house's owner Thomas Whitgreave coolly bluffed it out with the troopers.
One day he was down a priest-hole, another he was disguised as a farm worker, and another - the most famous day of all - he spent up a tree.
At Moseley Hall on the northern edge of Wolverhampton, Charles was obliged to try out the priest-hole lately reserved for the resident cleric.
In the Manor's loft are the remnants of a 'priest-hole' from the early 16th century, when being a Roman Catholic priest was not the safest of 'job'.
The house itself is a wonderful moated manor house that dates back to mediaeval times with secret priest-holes and all the furnishings and paintings from days gone by.
Ask newcomers to find the ingenious priest-holes at Harvington Hall and they could spend days in a forlorn search.