priest-ridden

Related to priest-ridden: donnot, Ginormous

priest-ridden

adj
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) dominated or governed by or excessively under the influence of priests
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Translations

priest-ridden

adjklerikalistisch
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in classic literature ?
when art a got up there I never mind what dost say; but I won't be priest-ridden, nor taught how to behave myself by thee.
One would almost imagine from the long list that is given of cannibal primates, bishops, arch-deacons, prebendaries, and other inferior ecclesiastics, that the sacerdotal order far outnumbered the rest of the population, and that the poor natives were more severely priest-ridden than even the inhabitants of the papal states.
Jinnah, Ayub and Rahman insisted, 'Pakistan was not created to become a priest-ridden society.' So when Bhutto and his left-leaning outfit, the Pakistan People's Party (PPP) used the term Islamic Socialism as a way to counter the Ayub dictatorship in the late 1960s, to Rahman, Islamic Socialism was just another expression of Islamic Modernism.
The task of converting these "priest-ridden and feckless" (154) Catholics at source, before they might emigrate to the United States, seemed a particularly urgent task in the wake of the Irish Famine.
In the not-too-distant past she would have not only insisted on a physical border she would have a large trench dug and filled with burning tar to separate her part of the UK from the priest-ridden Republic of Ireland.
Jefferson's letters to Humboldt make clear his mistrust of commerce, his views on Latin American independence movements, and his fear that such a "priest-ridden people" could never maintain a democratic government.
Once as priest-ridden as de Valera's Ireland or Franco's Spain, Quebec is today a society not only thoroughly secular but proud of it.
These are the bookends of the century-long journey he presents of American Catholics breaking free of priest-ridden ceremonies and hierarchical directives from faraway Rome.
Trevelyan claims that the reason Ireland was called "priest-ridden" or "priest-led" under Cromwell was because the English had destroyed or dislocated the native gentry.
Mitchell's own deeply researched chapter examines the place occupied by Irish Catholics in the west of Scotland in the age of industrialisation, re-examining the traditional, Victorian image of the Irish as a despised, priest-ridden people.
Chambers, an acclaimed journalist, even argues that over a period of five years "Quebec's churches were emptied and the 'priest-ridden' society disappeared without a trace." (19) This view of the Quiet Revolution as a "dramatic break" with a "parochial past" is also repeated in the book's introduction, where the Sixties in Quebec are portrayed as "a bridge from the time of Maurice Duplessis and the Grande noirceur to a vibrant, progressive, and modern Quebec." (4) There is no doubt that the Quiet Revolution was an important moment in Quebec history', but such generalizations, ignoring the rich historiographical debates on the topic, contribute little to our understanding of the period.