priest

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priest

 (prēst)
n.
1. In many Christian churches, a member of the second grade of clergy ranking below a bishop but above a deacon and having authority to administer the sacraments.
2. A person having the authority to perform and administer religious rites.
tr.v. priest·ed, priest·ing, priests
To ordain or admit to the priesthood.

[Middle English prest, from Old English prēost, from Late Latin presbyter; see presbyter.]

priest

(priːst) or feminine

priestess

n
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) Christianity a person ordained to act as a mediator between God and man in administering the sacraments, preaching, blessing, guiding, etc
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) (in episcopal Churches) a minister in the second grade of the hierarchy of holy orders, ranking below a bishop but above a deacon
3. (Ecclesiastical Terms) a minister of any religion
4. (Judaism) Judaism a descendant of the family of Aaron who has certain privileges in the synagogue service
5. (Other Non-Christian Religions) (in some non-Christian religions) an official who offers sacrifice on behalf of the people and performs other religious ceremonies
6. (Breeds) (sometimes capital) a variety of fancy pigeon having a bald pate with a crest or peak at the back of the head
7. (Angling) angling a small club used to kill fish caught
vb (tr)
(Ecclesiastical Terms) to make a priest; ordain
[Old English prēost, apparently from presbyter; related to Old High German prēster, Old French prestre]
ˈpriestˌlike adj

priest

(prist)

n.
1. (in Christian use)
a. a person ordained to the sacerdotal or pastoral office; a member of the clergy; minister.
b. (in hierarchical churches) a member of the clergy of the order next below that of bishop, authorized to carry out the Christian ministry.
2. a minister of any religion.
3. one whose office it is to perform religious rites, esp. to make sacrificial offerings.
v.t.
4. to ordain as a priest.
[before 900; Middle English prest(e), priest, Old English prēost, ultimately < Late Latin presbyter presbyter]

priest


Past participle: priested
Gerund: priesting

Imperative
priest
priest
Present
I priest
you priest
he/she/it priests
we priest
you priest
they priest
Preterite
I priested
you priested
he/she/it priested
we priested
you priested
they priested
Present Continuous
I am priesting
you are priesting
he/she/it is priesting
we are priesting
you are priesting
they are priesting
Present Perfect
I have priested
you have priested
he/she/it has priested
we have priested
you have priested
they have priested
Past Continuous
I was priesting
you were priesting
he/she/it was priesting
we were priesting
you were priesting
they were priesting
Past Perfect
I had priested
you had priested
he/she/it had priested
we had priested
you had priested
they had priested
Future
I will priest
you will priest
he/she/it will priest
we will priest
you will priest
they will priest
Future Perfect
I will have priested
you will have priested
he/she/it will have priested
we will have priested
you will have priested
they will have priested
Future Continuous
I will be priesting
you will be priesting
he/she/it will be priesting
we will be priesting
you will be priesting
they will be priesting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been priesting
you have been priesting
he/she/it has been priesting
we have been priesting
you have been priesting
they have been priesting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been priesting
you will have been priesting
he/she/it will have been priesting
we will have been priesting
you will have been priesting
they will have been priesting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been priesting
you had been priesting
he/she/it had been priesting
we had been priesting
you had been priesting
they had been priesting
Conditional
I would priest
you would priest
he/she/it would priest
we would priest
you would priest
they would priest
Past Conditional
I would have priested
you would have priested
he/she/it would have priested
we would have priested
you would have priested
they would have priested
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.priest - a clergyman in Christian churches who has the authority to perform or administer various religious ritespriest - a clergyman in Christian churches who has the authority to perform or administer various religious rites; one of the Holy Orders
archpriest, prelate, primate, hierarch, high priest - a senior clergyman and dignitary
bishop - a senior member of the Christian clergy having spiritual and administrative authority; appointed in Christian churches to oversee priests or ministers; considered in some churches to be successors of the twelve Apostles of Christ
canon - a priest who is a member of a cathedral chapter
celebrant - an officiating priest celebrating the Eucharist
clergyman, man of the cloth, reverend - a member of the clergy and a spiritual leader of the Christian Church
confessor - a priest who hears confession and gives absolution
domestic prelate - (Roman Catholic Church) a priest who is an honorary member of the papal household
Padre, Father - `Father' is a term of address for priests in some churches (especially the Roman Catholic Church or the Orthodox Catholic Church); `Padre' is frequently used in the military
Monsignor - (Roman Catholic Church) an ecclesiastical title of honor bestowed on some priests
pontifex - a member of the highest council of priests in ancient Rome
priestess - a woman priest
vicar - a Roman Catholic priest who acts for another higher-ranking clergyman
Holy Order, Order - (usually plural) the status or rank or office of a Christian clergyman in an ecclesiastical hierarchy; "theologians still disagree over whether `bishop' should or should not be a separate Order"
2.priest - a person who performs religious duties and ceremonies in a non-Christian religion
spiritual leader - a leader in religious or sacred affairs
Druid - a pre-Christian priest among the Celts of ancient Gaul and Britain and Ireland
flamen - a priest who served a particular deity in ancient Rome
hoodoo - a practitioner of voodoo
lama - a Tibetan or Mongolian priest of Lamaism
magus - a member of the Zoroastrian priesthood of the ancient Persians
priest-doctor, shaman - in societies practicing shamanism: one acting as a medium between the visible and spirit worlds; practices sorcery for healing or divination
votary - a priest or priestess (or consecrated worshipper) in a non-Christian religion or cult; "a votary of Aphrodite"

priest

Related words
adjective hieratic
Quotations
"The clergyman is expected to be a kind of human Sunday" [Samuel Butler The Way of All Flesh]
"A priest,"
"A piece of mere church furniture at best" [William Cowper Tirocinium]
Translations
كَاهِنكاهِن، قِسّيسكاهِنَه
свещеник
knězduchovní
præst
preester
pappi
svećenik
pap
pendeta
kvenprestur; hofgyîjaprestur
司祭牧師
신부
flamensacerdos
vaidila
mācītājspriesterisvaidelotis
kňaz
duhovniksvečenik
popsvećeniksveštenik
prästprostpastor
พระ
papazrahipdin adamıdin görevlisi
жрецьієрейксьондзотецьпіп
linh mục

priest

[priːst] N (gen, pagan) → sacerdote m; (Christian) → sacerdote m, cura m
woman priestdiaconisa f
see also high D
see also ordain A2
see also parish B

priest

[ˈpriːst] nprêtre m
He's a priest → Il est prêtre.

priest

nPriester(in) m(f), → Geistliche(r) mf

priest

:
priest-hole
nverborgener Winkel (in dem verfolgte Priester versteckt wurden)
priesthood
nPriestertum nt; (= priests collectively)Priesterschaft f; to enter the priestPriester werden

priest

[priːst] nprete m, sacerdote m

priest

(priːst) noun
1. (in the Christian Church, especially the Roman Catholic, Orthodox and Anglican churches) a clergyman.
2. (feminine ˈpriestess) (in non-Christian religions) an official who performs sacrifices etc to the god(s).
ˈpriesthood noun
1. priests in general. the Anglican priesthood.
2. the office or position of a priest. He was called to the priesthood.

priest

كَاهِن kněz præst Priester ιερέας sacerdote pappi prêtre svećenik prete 司祭 신부 priester prest kapłan padre священник präst พระ rahip linh mục 牧师

priest

n. sacerdote, padre, cura.

priest

n sacerdote m, cura m
References in classic literature ?
While Laurie listlessly watched the procession of priests under their canopies, white-veiled nuns bearing lighted tapers, and some brotherhood in blue chanting as they walked, Amy watched him, and felt a new sort of shyness steal over her, for he was changed, and she could not find the merry-faced boy she left in the moody-looking man beside her.
One only of the priests in the temple of Quitzel escaped and set down part of the tale," said the professor.
That's a charm; some kind of hoodoo business that one o' them priests gave him to keep him out o' trouble.
I know not but man may so deform his works in the settlement, as to leave that which is so clear in the wilderness a matter of doubt among traders and priests.
Two or three individuals hinted that the man of skill, during his Indian captivity, had enlarged his medical attainments by joining in the incantations of the savage priests, who were universally acknowledged to be powerful enchanters, often performing seemingly miraculous cures by their skill in the black art.
The ribs were hung with trophies; the vertebrae were carved with Arsacidean annals, in strange hieroglyphics; in the skull, the priests kept up an unextinguished aromatic flame, so that the mystic head again sent forth its vapory spout; while, suspended from a bough, the terrific lower jaw vibrated over all the devotees, like the hair-hung sword that so affrighted damocles.
Jeweled images are made of him, sensual priests burn incense to him, and modern pirates of industry bring their dollars, wrung from the toil of helpless women and children, and build temples to him, and sit in cushioned seats and listen to his teachings expounded by doctors of dusty divinity--"
Then he said nobody in the country could read or write but a few dozen priests.
The gorge under our feet--called Allerheiligen--afforded room in the grassy level at its head for a cozy and delightful human nest, shut away from the world and its botherations, and consequently the monks of the old times had not failed to spy it out; and here were the brown and comely ruins of their church and convent to prove that priests had as fine an instinct seven hundred years ago in ferreting out the choicest nooks and corners in a land as priests have today.
Come, saints and sinners, hear me tell How pious priests whip Jack and Nell, And women buy and children sell, And preach all sinners down to hell, And sing of heavenly union.
After these appear'd A crew who under Names of old Renown, OSIRIS, ISIS, ORUS and their Train With monstrous shapes and sorceries abus'd Fanatic EGYPT and her Priests, to seek Thir wandring Gods disguis'd in brutish forms Rather then human.
There were several of his priests and lawyers present (as I conjectured by their habits), who were commanded to address themselves to me; and I spoke to them in as many languages as I had the least smattering of, which were High and Low Dutch, Latin, French, Spanish, Italian, and Lingua Franca, but all to no purpose.