priggishness


Also found in: Thesaurus.
Related to priggishness: priggery, priggishly

prig

 (prĭg)
n.
1. A person who demonstrates an exaggerated conformity or propriety, especially in an irritatingly arrogant or smug manner.
2. Archaic
a. A petty thief or pickpocket.
b. A conceited dandy; a fop.
tr.v. prigged, prig·ging, prigs Chiefly British
To steal or pilfer.

[Origin unknown.]

prig′ger·y n.
prig′gish adj.
prig′gish·ly adv.
prig′gish·ness n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.priggishness - exaggerated and arrogant properness
correctitude, properness, propriety - correct or appropriate behavior
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
تَباهٍ، إعْتِزاز
domýšlivost
selvgladhed
beképzeltség
sjálfumgleîi, sjálfsánægja
ukalâlık

priggishness

[ˈprɪgɪʃnɪs] Ngazmoñería f, mojigatería f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

priggishness

ntugendhaftes Getue, Tugendhaftigkeit f; (= snobbishness)Hochnäsigkeit f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

priggishness

[ˈprɪgɪʃnɪs] n (of person) → atteggiamento moraleggiante
the priggishness of his behaviour → il suo atteggiamento moraleggiante
the priggishness of his remarks → il suo tono moraleggiante
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

prig

(prig) noun
a person who is too satisfied with his/her own behaviour, beliefs etc.
ˈpriggish adjective
ˈpriggishly adverb
ˈpriggishness noun
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
Now, as I look back, I think it was sheer priggishness to resist so human and yet so reverent an impulse.
You pass it to the lower classes, and they pass it back to you, and this you call 'social intercourse' or 'mutual endeavour,' when it's mutual priggishness if it's anything.
The Apollo editorial, on the other hand, adopted a resolutely positive approach, noting how Clifford had been subjected to a torrent of abuse, 'especially in Scotland, where the traditions of the kirk seem to have taught people to enjoy taking their pleasures sadly [...] Underlying the whole, one detects a British stick-in-the-mud attitude to change itself, and a nasty priggishness that recoils from a rich interior because it is reminded uncomfortably that most art was created for the rich.'
Mehr's priggishness about dressing, language and mannerisms becomes suffocating, and Sehr's rebellion manifests itself in the form of smoking and flirting only.
Whilst some people may mistake his mannerisms and meticulous demeanour as priggishness, he makes no qualms about all this.
For him, Washington's (and the Gospel's) admonition to mind one's own imperfections, looking not for specks in others' eyes, was priggishness. When senators asked him how his commitment to everlasting peace differed from a commitment to perpetual war, he was unable to answer.
"It may be a generational thing but now, I think, the pendulum has swung too far." And the British author and journalist Helena Frith Powell, born to Swedish and Italian parents, wrote in Britain's Daily Mail that many in Britain were "paralyzed by political correctness, too scared to say anything as this terrifying tide of separatism and priggishness sweeps the Western world."
Of course, it's wrong to respond priggishly to priggishness. But, confronted with those who have been shouting, 'That's not literature!
is about earnestness, that is, Victorian solemnity, that kind of false seriousness which means hypocrisy, priggishness, and lack of irony.
(Priggishness is especially in evidence when women fail to derive pleasure from manifestly misogynist, often scatological texts.) But never, under any circumstances, does he deploy a dualism that associates mind with the female, because, for thinkers, mind is the most valuable term.
Manliness today is exaggerated, toward extreme machismo on one side and effeminate priggishness on the other.