primordial

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pri·mor·di·al

 (prī-môr′dē-əl)
adj.
1. Being or happening first in sequence of time; original.
2. Primary or fundamental: play a primordial role.
3. Biology Belonging to or characteristic of the earliest stage of development of an organism or a part: primordial cells.
n.
A basic principle.

[Middle English, from Late Latin prīmōrdiālis, from Latin prīmōrdium, origin : prīmus, first; see per in Indo-European roots + ōrdīrī, to begin to weave; see ar- in Indo-European roots.]

pri·mor′di·al·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

primordial

(praɪˈmɔːdɪəl)
adj
1. existing at or from the beginning; earliest; primeval
2. constituting an origin; fundamental
3. (Biology) biology of or relating to an early stage of development: primordial germ cells.
n
an elementary or basic principle
[C14: from Late Latin prīmōrdiālis original, from Latin prīmus first + ōrdīrī to begin]
priˌmordiˈality n
priˈmordially adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

pri•mor•di•al

(praɪˈmɔr di əl)

adj.
1. constituting the earliest stages; original: primordial forms of life.
2. existing at or from the very beginning: primordial matter.
[1350–1400; < Late Latin prīmōrdiālis. See primordium, -al1]
pri•mor′di•al•ly, adv.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.primordial - having existed from the beginningprimordial - having existed from the beginning; in an earliest or original stage or state; "aboriginal forests"; "primal eras before the appearance of life on earth"; "the forest primeval"; "primordial matter"; "primordial forms of life"
early - at or near the beginning of a period of time or course of events or before the usual or expected time; "early morning"; "an early warning"; "early diagnosis"; "an early death"; "took early retirement"; "an early spring"; "early varieties of peas and tomatoes mature before most standard varieties"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

primordial

adjective
1. primeval, primitive, first, earliest, pristine, primal, prehistoric Twenty million years ago this was dense primordial forest.
2. fundamental, original, basic, radical, elemental primordial particles generated by the Big Bang
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

primordial

adjective
Preceding all others in time:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
primordial

primordial

[praɪˈmɔːdɪəl] ADJprimordial
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

primordial

[praɪˈmɔːrdiəl] adj (= primeval) → primordial(e)
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

primordial

adjprimordial (spec), → ursprünglich; primordial slimeUrschleim m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

primordial

[praɪˈmɔːdɪəl] adjprimordiale
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
"What has mythology to do with origins?" asks Karl Kerenyi (3), suggesting that since mythical narratives always happen in a primordial time, the "return to the origins and to primordiality is a basic feature of every mythology" (9).
Among his topics are Yves Bonnefoy, &lt;/La Grande Ourse/&gt;: voice, consciousness, presence, naming; Venus Khoury-Ghata, &lt;/Le Libre des Suppliques/&gt;: hauntedness, vigilance, fable, circularity; Tahar Ben Jelloun, &lt;/Que la Blessure se Ferme/&gt;: light, love, passion, paradox; Marie-Claire Bancquart, &lt;/Trace du Vivant/&gt;: primordiality, rites, question, rebirth; and Jacques Dupin, &lt;/Le Gresil: &lt;/Ubac/&gt; and &lt;/Abret/&gt;, individuation and pleroma.
Knowing that the help of an activist or a reporter or an academic will supplement/publicize the resistance, the Kandha behave in response to that external requirement, which only wants to hear about the his/her primordiality and premodern life.
Husserl and Heidegger on Reduction, Primordiality, and the Categorial.
Third, the primordiality of patrilineal lineages and descent itself is open to contention as Walker Connor reminds us that it is not active, real kinship or blood ties but a subjective self-belief on the part of the practitioners that is the key element in analysis.
My mentor, Paul Ricoeur, correctly affirms the ontological primacy of yes over no, the primordiality of good over evil.
I mean only to note that the ideas are hypothesized in fully reflective awareness of their primordiality, and hence of the incompleteness of any account of them.
(Boia 2005: 93) While the first sense would assume primordiality and superiority of the German people over other nations and thus justify the expansionist tendencies, the second, but the original meaning, would assume primacy of the nation over any other values; primordiality should be in the field of options, not of any hierarchy with other nations.
I said above that the Thomist argument for the incorruptibility of the human soul takes a leap beyond this sort of general appreciation of the primordiality of consciousness and sees the possibility of the rational soul's actual detachment from matter, basing the argument on the impossibility of a one-to-one correlation between mind and brain.
Philosophical theologian Kirkpatrick is interested in establishing "the primordiality of God as an agent" (15) in contrast to an ontology of God.
Due to colonization, however, entities--and the conception of them--threaten to become unmoored from their primordiality. One example of this tendency lies in the current and common translation of the Moari term ira as 'gene.' This static casting of the erstwhile fluid nature of the phenomenon that ira indicated has consequences not only for how one perceives the world but, additionally, for both the self and the thing itself....
Ethnicity, primordiality and the promise of social science in Africa: The Nigerian situation.