princess


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Related to princess: Princess Diana

prin·cess

 (prĭn′sĭs, -sĕs′, prĭn-sĕs′)
n.
1. A woman member of a royal family other than the monarch, especially a daughter of a monarch.
2.
a. A woman who is a ruler of a principality.
b. A woman who is a hereditary ruler; a queen.
3. A noblewoman of varying status or rank.
4. The wife of a prince.
5. A woman regarded as having the status or qualities of a princess.
adj.
Designed to hang in smooth, close-fitting, unbroken lines from shoulder to flared hem: a princess dress.

[Middle English princesse, from Old French, feminine of prince, prince; see prince.]

princess

(prɪnˈsɛs)
n
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) (in Britain) a daughter of the sovereign or of one of the sovereign's sons
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a nonreigning female member of a sovereign family
3. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the wife and consort of a prince
4. any very attractive or outstanding woman
5. (Clothing & Fashion) Also called: princess dress or princess line a style of dress with a fitted bodice and an A-line skirt that is shaped by seams from shoulder to hem without a seam at the waistline

prin•cess

(ˈprɪn sɪs, -sɛs, prɪnˈsɛs)

n.
1. a nonreigning female member of a royal family.
2. the wife and consort of a prince.
3. (in Great Britain) a daughter of the sovereign or of a son of the sovereign.
4. a woman or girl regarded or treated as a princess: a middle-class American princess.
5. Archaic. a female monarch or queen.
adj.
6. Also, prin′cesse. (of a woman's dress, coat, or the like) styled with a close-fitting bodice and flared skirt, cut in single pieces, as gores, from shoulder to hem.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Middle French]
usage: See -ess.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.princess - a female member of a royal family other than the queen (especially the daughter of a sovereign)princess - a female member of a royal family other than the queen (especially the daughter of a sovereign)
royal family, royal house, royal line, royalty - royal persons collectively; "the wedding was attended by royalty"
archduchess - a wife or widow of an archduke or a princess of the former ruling house of Austria
aristocrat, blue blood, patrician - a member of the aristocracy
crown princess - a female heir apparent to a throne
maharanee, maharani - a great rani; a princess in India or the wife of a maharaja
princess royal - the eldest daughter of a British sovereign

princess

noun ruler, lady, monarch, sovereign, liege, crowned head, crowned princess, dynast, princess regent the Princess of Wales
Translations
أَمِيرَةالأميرَهزَوجَة أو أرمَلَة الأمير، أميرَه
princeznakněžna
prinsesse
prinsessa
princeza
prinsessa
王女
공주
kňažnáprincezná
kraljičnaprincesa
prinsessa
เจ้าหญิง
công chúa

princess

[prɪnˈses] N (= royal) → princesa f
Princess Victoriala Princesa Victoria
the Princess Royalla princesa real
the Princess of Walesla Princesa de Gales
see also crown C

princess

[ˌprɪnˈsɛs] nprincesse f
Princess Anne → la princesse Anne

princess

nPrinzessin f; (= wife of ruler)Fürstin f

princess

[prɪnˈsɛs] nprincipessa

prince

(prins) noun
1. a male member of a royal family, especially the son of a king or queen. Prince Charles.
2. the ruler of some states or countries. Prince Rainier of Monaco.
ˈprincely adjective
1. of a prince. princely duties.
2. magnificent; splendid. a princely gift.
princess (prinˈses) , ((American) ˈprinsəs) noun
1. the wife or widow of a prince.
2. a woman of the same rank as a prince in her own right. Princess Anne.
princiˈpality (-ˈpӕ-) plural ˌprinciˈpalities noun
a state or country ruled by a prince.

princess

أَمِيرَة princezna prinsesse Prinzessin πριγκίπισσα princesa prinsessa princesse princeza principessa 王女 공주 prinses prinsesse księżniczka princesa принцесса prinsessa เจ้าหญิง prenses công chúa 公主
References in classic literature ?
"Sire," replied the princess, "this is not the one you gave me before and whose ring I wear.
The emir, who had expected to hear the princess talk nonsense, finding how calm and reasonable she was, assured the king that he could not venture to undertake a cure, but placed his head at his Majesty's disposal, on which the justly irritated monarch promptly had it cut off.
The soldier saw them going down through the trap-door one after another, the eldest leading the way; and thinking he had no time to lose, he jumped up, put on the cloak which the old woman had given him, and followed them; but in the middle of the stairs he trod on the gown of the youngest princess, and she cried out to her sisters, 'All is not right; someone took hold of my gown.' 'You silly creature!' said the eldest, 'it is nothing but a nail in the wall.' Then down they all went, and at the bottom they found themselves in a most delightful grove of trees; and the leaves were all of silver, and glittered and sparkled beautifully.
There they all landed, and went into the castle, and each prince danced with his princess; and the soldier, who was all the time invisible, danced with them too; and when any of the princesses had a cup of wine set by her, he drank it all up, so that when she put the cup to her mouth it was empty.
After spending the greater part of his early youth in pleasure, he met a Princess of such remarkable beauty that he at once asked her hand in marriage, and, having obtained it, considered himself the happiest of men.
No more exquisitely lovely mortal was ever seen than this Princess, and it needed all an eagle's strength of sight to prevent the King being hopelessly dazzled.
It was certainly rather cool of him to say to the Emperor's daughter, "Will you have me?" But so he did; for his name was renowned far and wide; and there were a hundred princesses who would have answered, "Yes!" and "Thank you kindly." We shall see what this princess said.
So the Princess was to have the rose, and the nightingale; and they were accordingly put into large silver caskets, and sent to her.
"No, I'm going away myself, princess. To my brother's for a holiday.
"Oh, that would be impossible!" answered the princess. "Is it true that eight hundred have been sent from us already?
"It seems that there will be no need to bring Mary out, suitors are coming to us of their own accord," incautiously remarked the little princess on hearing the news.
And now, from the hints contained in his letter and given by the little princess, he saw which way the wind was blowing, and his low opinion changed into a feeling of contemptuous ill will.