principle of least action


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principle of least action

n
(General Physics) the principle that motion between any two points in a conservative dynamical system is such that the action has a minimum value with respect to all paths between the points that correspond to the same energy. Also called: Maupertuis principle
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The variational principle of least action becomes here, without difficulties, a postulate.
In order to determine the dynamical trajectory of a point in the lizard, we resort to the principle of least action. This is a powerful variational principle of particle and continuum systems.
"The Lazy Universe: An Introduction to the Principle of Least Action" is a rare book on a rare topic: it is about 'action' and the Principle of Least Action.
Critique: A deftly crafted work of seminal scholarship from beginning to end, "The Lazy Universe: An Introduction to the Principle of Least Action" is an extraordinary study enhanced for academia with the inclusion of an informative Preface and Introduction, figures, a Bibliography and listing of suggests for further reading, as well as an six page index.
To answer the above questions, we apply a new measure to quantify organization complexity and the rate of self-organization based on the Principle of Least Action [69].
Brizard presents students, academics, and researchers with the second edition of his comprehensive introduction to Langrangian mechanics, the history of the Langrangian method, FermatEs Principle of Least Time, and the mathematical principles of several mathematical predecessors of HamiltonEs Principle of Least Action and the Euler-Lagrange equations of motion.
This is indeed true, although the principle is better known under its more common name 'principle of least action'.
Recently derivation of CTG equations was made based on the principle of least action [3].
But although Feynman could be lighthearted and amusing when explaining science, he was starkly serious when in its thrall; once enticed by a high-school teacher to study a spinoff of Fermat's Principle called the "principle of least action," he was smitten.
But Darwinian Evolution, being a natural process, is itself subject to the principle of least action. For most practical survival purposes, the vital requirement is a quick assessment of the situation, not a scrupulously accurate one.

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