print reference


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print reference

A reference to an individual print in an air photographic sortie.
Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms. US Department of Defense 2005.
References in periodicals archive ?
The site StarWars.com notes that its first apparent print reference was in the London Evening News, in a congratulatory ad to Prime MinisterElect Margaret Thatcher on her victory on May 4, 1979.
The evaluation of the summary might well be compared with other print reference sources.
The process of reformatting print reference into electronic reference is largely complete with revenues from electronic formats in 2015 accounting for 70% of total, up from 22% in 2000.
There was even a section devoted to unfortunate events, including a small print reference to "simulated neck biting", whatever that is.
Critique: Profusely illustrated with both color and black-and-white images, "Small Victories" is a seminal work enhanced with the inclusion of extensive indices and bibliography, making it and impressively informed and informative original print reference book.
The topical bibliography as a print reference tool is virtually dead, but few are likely to mourn.
Elsevier still plans to release its print reference works, but the company has embraced the digital format with Reference Modules and the advantages it holds over the older print method, which traditionally saw publishers releasing new sets of encyclopedias every 5-7 years.
Like our old print magazine collections, the print reference collection is suffering its last death rattles.
(2007), was used to classify the educators' utterances into four levels of decontextualized talk and to identify utterances that used print reference keywords, alphabet letter names, or alphabet letter sounds.
How much longer will print reference collections be needed?
The age of Wikipedia confronts us with this question: Do we need print reference books for information that we can look up online?
Put together, the website contains 20 print reference sources from Oxford such as its Bible dictionary, atlas and the voluminous encyclopedias.